In its recent editorial, The Baltimore Sun expresses skepticism regarding the idea of a Towson circulator ("Circulator skepticism," Jan. 15). That is precisely why the Baltimore County Council supported a pilot program for this transit service: there are many questions that can only be answered once a circulator is put into operation.

I share County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's optimism for the future of Towson. His administration has helped attract investors to a deteriorating commercial core and has made more than $50 million in improvements to the schools that serve this growing region. It is on other issues, however, where the Baltimore County Council has parted ways with the administration. We have demanded more open space funding from developers, public input on the design of buildings and a more thoughtful approach to transportation.

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The Towson circulator could be part of that integrated approach. It would connect commercial hubs like Towson Town Center, The Shops at Kenilworth, and the restaurant district, as well as our two universities and medical institutions. The Baltimore Sun asks why Towson needs a distinct transportation service, but the answer is clear: Towson has a uniquely dense character that stands out from other communities.

Many of the issues raised in your editorial could be addressed in a pilot program. For example, your editorial appropriately questions the size of vehicles that could properly navigate Towson's neighborhoods.

We should never be afraid to try out new ideas. What we should fear is the gridlock that might occur without a real solution to Towson's transportation challenges.

The County Council, our state legislators, and business and residential leaders have offered a proposal. If the circulator is not the answer, we look forward to the county executive's alternative.

David Marks, Towson

The writer represents the 5th District on the Baltimore County Council.

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