xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Larry Hogan's political crossroads: A tale told in four numbers

"We should never use the word 'never'" says former Gov. Parris Glendening on a potential Larry Hogan presidential run, after Hogan's State of the State address. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun video)

As Larry Hogan returns from a round of presidential-run footsie in first-caucusing Iowa, including by now familiar interviews with national outlets about how he’s keeping his options open for a primary challenge to President Donald Trump, Maryland’s Republican governor would seem to be riding high. But in reality, he’s hurdling fast toward a reality check. It’s not Maryland’s Democrats who are going to make trouble for him — they’d probably be delighted to see him run for president, figuring a run would get him out of their hair for the next two years and boost the odds that President Trump will lose in 2020. No, it’s the contradictions inherent in Mr. Hogan’s position that set him up for tough times ahead. Here’s the story of the irresistible forces and immovable objects of Governor Hogan’s future, told in four numbers.

William E. "Brit" Kirwan appears with legislators to announce plans for initial implementation of education spending recommended by the commission he chairs.
William E. "Brit" Kirwan appears with legislators to announce plans for initial implementation of education spending recommended by the commission he chairs. (Luke Broadwater/BaltimoreSun)
  • $1 billion. That’s the approximate cost over this year and next of the legislation House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller are fast-tracking to begin implementing the recommendations of the Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education, known as Kirwan Commission. It contains a variety of provisions voters support, like an expansion of public pre-K, better career training in high school, higher salaries and standards for teachers, and strong accountability mechanisms to make sure the money is used properly. It has the support of heavy hitters in the state’s business and higher education communities, and it's backed by exhaustive research into how Maryland’s schools stack up against the competition domestically and internationally (not so well) and how they can be reformed to better serve all students. Among those who voted in favor of the commission’s final recommendations was Mr. Hogan's budget secretary. When fully phased in after a decade, Kirwan would cost the state an extra $3.8 billion a year.
Comptroller Peter Franchot's office is expected to write down anticipated Maryland tax revenues by as much as $350 million.
Comptroller Peter Franchot's office is expected to write down anticipated Maryland tax revenues by as much as $350 million. (Kim Hairston / Baltimore Sun)
  • $250 million. That’s the amount by which the state’s Board of Revenue Estimates is expected to reduce its projections for Maryland tax collections when it meets this week. The federal government shutdown hurt Maryland badly, but the bigger issue is that the sugar high from the Trump tax cuts is wearing off. And it’s not like the state was flush before that. Even without this latest revenue write-down, even without Kirwan, Governor Hogan’s budget department estimated that Maryland’s projected spending will exceed revenues by nearly $6 billion over the next four years. Mr. Hogan campaigned a promise not to raise taxes, and he’s stuck to it so far, but he’s never faced anything like this before. When he came into office in 2015, the projected four-year deficit was just $255 million.
Gov. Larry Hogan has a sky-high approval rating in Maryland of 78 percent, including overwhelming support by Democrats.
Gov. Larry Hogan has a sky-high approval rating in Maryland of 78 percent, including overwhelming support by Democrats. (Jose Luis Magana / AP)

It’s all well and good for Governor Hogan to say he’s keeping his options open on a 2020 primary challenge to President Trump, but at some point soon, he’s going to face a major crossroads. It’s highly likely that in the next few weeks, Democrats will present him with legislation committing the state to an extra billion dollars in spending at a time when we don’t have a spare billion lying around, or anything like it. What’s more, the clear and stated intent here is to lay down a marker for full implementation of Kirwan that, once established, voters will be loath to give up. What then? The Governor Hogan with a 78 percent approval rating in Maryland signs the bill and works with Democrats to find a way to pay for it. The Governor Hogan who even wants to contemplate a primary challenge against a president with a 93 percent approval rating from his party vetoes it and rails against irresponsible Democrats. He can't be both. Which will he choose?

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement