xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

What they're saying about Martin O'Malley after Iowa

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley has suspended his presidential campaign after registering little more than a blip on the Iowa caucus radar.

O'Malley made little noise Monday night while fellow candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders were in a dead heat late into the night.

Advertisement

Here's a sampling of what's being said about O'Malley the day after his campaign came to a close:

Advertisement

The former Maryland governor spent more time in Iowa than either of his rivals during the 2016 election season. But he came in a distant third in Iowa's Democratic caucuses and languished in the polls.

...
O'Malley campaigned aggressively on immigration reform, gun control and climate change, and he became a critical player in recent days. With Democratic caucuses requiring candidates to reach 15 percent viability, O'Malley's supporters became coveted by both the Clinton and Sanders camps.

Yes, reasonable arguments can be made that O'Malley was a victim of bad timing. He was an insider, a part of the Democratic Party establishment in a year in which voters across the political spectrum really haven't shown a preference for that sort of resume. And during his meteoric rise from the halls of Baltimore City Hall to the governor's office in Annapolis, O'Malley established himself as both tough on crime and an advocate of a particularly aggressive form of policing sometimes described as zero-tolerance. Its critics, of course, say that zero tolerance and that politicians like O'Malley who embraced it are at least partially responsible for the nation's mass incarceration problem and deeply damaged relationships between police and some of the communities they serve.

 CNN

The former Maryland governor used his speech to push for greater gun control, action to address climate change, equal pay for women and other efforts to address income inequality. He expressed gratitude to his supporters and the people of Iowa, but took a moment to denounce the "racist and fascist rhetoric of Donald Trump."

"We have to hold strong to the values that make us Americans," said O'Malley as his family stood by his side. "And that, too, was what this tough fight was about."

O'Malley did not endorse a candidate as Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders were locked in a virtual tie in the first-in-the-nation voting state.

The Wall Street Journal wrote in the days leading up to the Iowa caucus about how O'Malley sat essentially unrecognizable at the Des Moines International airport.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement