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Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word:

LACONIC

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The Athenians were a gabby lot, but the soldierly Spartans were people, men mainly, of few words. From the Greek

Lakon

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, Laconia or Sparta, and

Lakonikos

, we get the English word

laconic

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(pronounced luh-KAHN-ik), meaning terse or concise to the point of appearing rude or mysterious.

Example:

From a 1996 column by Maureen Dowd in

The New York Times

: "

We would rather have a smiling, shape-shifting Democrat we don't trust than a frowning, laconic Republican we trust more."
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