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Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word: 

SUSURRANT

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One of the lovelier onomatopoeic words in English is susurrant (pronounced suh-SUR-ant), the sibilants of which echo its meanings: "whispering," "murmuring," "rustling." It is the adjectival form of susurrus, "a whispering or rustling sound."

Susurrus is a direct lift from Latin, where it means "humming" or "muttering."

Example: From James Parker's 2011 article in The Atlantic on R.E.M., "America's Rock Band": "When challenged in the early days about his sleepy, susurrant diction and bric-a-brac phraseology, or about the lack of a lyric sheet inside R.E.M.’s records, Stipe would sometimes refer questioners to Walker Percy’s essay 'Metaphor as Mistake'—an exploration of the ways whereby (as Percy writes) 'misnamings, misunderstandings, or misrememberings' can lead to 'an authentic poetic experience … an experience, moreover, which was notably absent before the mistake was made.' ”

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