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Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:

STENTORIAN

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In Book V of the Iliad, Hera gives a loud cry, and Homer says, "She had the look of Stentor, / whose brazen lungs could give a battle shout / as loud as fifty soldiers" (Fitzgerald translation).

Stentor, the loud-voiced Greek herald of the Trojan War, gives us the eponymous stentorian (pronounced sten-TOR-ee-uhn), meaning "very loud" and the less frequently encountered stentor, "person with a very loud voice."

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The presidential primary season has furnished us with an ample supply of stentors being stentorian, and those brazen lungs still have eight months of exercise until Election Day.

Example: From Mike Sager's description of Sparky in an article on clowns and clowning, "Who Likes Balloons?" in Esquire, June-July 2015: "His stentorian voice, cultivated on stages as large as Carnegie Hall, where he once sold out two straight performances, carries through the swirling smoke from the barbecue and across the carefully manicured terrain of Marina Park in San Leandro, California, just south of Oakland."

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