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Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word: 

MAGNILOQUENT

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Looking at magniloquent (pronounced mag-NIL-uh-kwent), your impulse will be to associate it with eloquent. Your instinct will be sound, because both words derive from the Latin loquere, "to speak." But magniloquent is eloquent trying too hard.

Like grandiloquent, magniloquent indicates language that is lofty, extravagant, bombastic, or boastful. The Oxford English Dictionary's first citation, from 1656, is relatively neutral, "that useth a stately manner of speaking or writeing." But close by is a citation from 1659 associating the word with excess: "Really they are no other than Hypocrites, magniloquent Montebanks."

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So dial it down a little.

Example: Mark Halperin and John F. Harris's The Way to Win: Taking the White House in 2008, writing of Karl Rove: "He is the subject of polling questions, cable TV chatter, and magniloquent public attacks."

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