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In academic writing, it is essential to dress up ordinary concepts with arcane vocabulary, and words from Greek and Latin are best of all. Otherwise, one risks revealing that one's deeper thoughts are commonplace, even obvious.

We have such a word this week:

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HEURISTIC

Its pedigree is impeccable: from the German heuristich, in turn from the Latin heuristicus, in turn from the Greek heuriskein, "to discover."

Pronounced hyu-RIS-tik, it means (wait for it) helping to learn. That is, thank you, Merriam-Webster, "involving or serving as an aid to learning, discovery, or problem-solving by experimental and especially trial-and-error methods"; also "of or relating to exploratory problem-solving techniques that utilize self-educating techniques (as the evaluation of feedback) to improve performance."

Make sure you include it often in your doctoral thesis in education.
Example: From an 1989 report on education: "Heuristic methods of teaching are methods which involve our placing students as far as possible in the attitude of the discoverer—methods which involve their finding out, instead of merely being told about things."
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