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Rodricks: Nobody asked me about Mosby, Kaepernick or the state song, but ...

Nobody asked me, but, while Marilyn Mosby, the Baltimore state's attorney, wants everyone to understand that there's no "overnight solution" to the city's violence, she offered no such understanding for her predecessor.

Starting with her campaign announcement in June 2013, Mosby blamed Greg Bernstein for rising violence. During Bernstein's tenure, annual homicides went from 197 (in 2011) to 235 (in 2013). The number actually dropped to 211 in 2014, the year Mosby upset Bernstein in the Democratic primary. What's happened since? In Mosby's first two years in office, homicides soared past 300 annually, and at the current rate we could be headed there again.

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"People want to look for an overnight solution," Mosby recently told The Baltimore Sun's Justin Fenton, "but a lot of what has gotten us to this place didn't happen overnight." Ah, yes. How experience doth gentle her condition.

Mosby, Davis sit down to talk about crime, collaboration

Nobody asked me, but Baltimore needs a public service campaign against the outrageous rate of gun violence in the city. Mayor Catherine Pugh, a champion of the arts, should get an accomplished filmmaker to produce a series of artful, street-smart videos, from 15 to 30 seconds long, that speak to people caught up in drugs, guns and gangs.

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She needs local TV stations to air the spots for free, and celebrities from sports and entertainment to carry the message. A slightly longer video with the same message could travel on social media. Baltimore needs a way to state, repeatedly and clearly, its desire to end this epoch.

Pugh could recruit Carmelo Anthony, the 10-time NBA All-Star and Olympian who grew up in Baltimore, to be the primary face of this project. In agreeing to record these messages, Anthony could dash any remaining infamy from his foolish appearance in the "Stop Snitchin'" video that promoted drug dealing and threatened violence against Baltimoreans who cooperate with police. It happened 13 years ago, but the video caused lingering harm.

Anthony has done a lot of good since then, and Pugh recently gave him a medal. But Melo can put his star power to further use with a direct, sober message about putting down the guns and finding a way off the streets. There are other celebrities with Baltimore connections and authentic voices who could join in this campaign. The mayor should get on this.

Nobody asked me, but the University of Maryland marching band has done us a great service with its decision to stop performing "Maryland, My Maryland." The lyrics to the state song were written during the Civil War by a Southern sympathizer who became a Confederate Navy man. The song refers to "Northern scum" and to Lincoln as a "despot" and "tyrant." It has been called "the 'Marseillaise' of the Confederacy" and "a despicable Confederate fight song dripping with hate." It was adopted as the state song in the time of Jim Crow and during a decade, the 1930s, when lynchings were still occurring in Maryland. Plus, the tune is "O Tannenbaum," so it's a ripoff that confuses people from sea to shining sea. ("Why are they singing, 'Oh, Christmas Tree,' during the Preakness?") Enough. Begone.

Nobody asked me, but it's total baloney that Colin Kaepernick, who took a knee during the national anthem last season to protest police brutality, had to make a choice between being a quarterback and social activist. That, however, must be how the National Football League views him — and bad for business at that. What else explains Kaepernick's unsigned status as the new NFL season begins? (And don't tell me it's because he can't read defenses.)

When Colin Kaepernick didn't stand for the national anthem before a preseason game last summer, perhaps he knew he was lighting a powder keg that would still burn a year later. Perhaps not.

Kaepernick has become a martyr and he owes part of his martyrdom to the Ravens. Just a month ago, the team expressed interest in him publicly, after quarterback Joe Flacco came up with a bad back, then apparently scratched the idea of signing him. I say "apparently" because there has been no final word. When I asked a Ravens official if Kaepernick was definitely out of the picture, I got such evasive answers it would be a waste of space to quote them here. Go Orioles!

Nobody asked me, but if Donald J. Trump rescinds Obama-era protections for "Dreamers," immigrants who as children entered the country without permission — most of them brought here by their parents — it will constitute a presidential action of singular malice and cruelty. It will mock the American dream and spit at decency, a spiteful attack on the legacy of one man, Trump's predecessor, that will affect hundreds of thousands of young men and women.

Nobody asked me, but someone needs to study the potential for brain trauma among moviegoers subjected to long previews. I recently sat through a series trailers for "Thor: Ragnarok," "Justice League," "Kingsmen: The Golden Circle," and "Blade Runner 2049." Delivered in succession — without a break for some quiet period film starring Judi Dench — they rattled my cranium. I should probably be in the concussion protocol now.

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