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I read Thomas Schaller's column ("Race had a role in Hogan's win," Nov. 11) regarding Larry Hogan's win over Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in the 2014 Maryland gubernatorial election. He basically states that the areas Mr. Hogan won had more white people then black.

I can only view this as electoral bean counting, and I haven't yet met one white person who stated they voted for Larry Hogan because he was white or against Mr. Brown because he was black. Conversely, many black people were subjected to the notion that if Mr. Hogan won, then civil rights would be set back to a state before the civil rights movement or worse, subjected to forces similar to the Ku Klux Klan.

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The main reason Mr. Hogan won was because, while editorially approved by The Sun, both Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Maryland General Assembly and their efforts to tax the labors of Marylanders were seen like a group of elderly people fighting over the last drops of water from the fountain of youth — they won't be satisfied until that pitcher broke on the ground.

I get along with most black people because we all are on the same page and appreciate the simple exchange of courtesy, acceptance and respect. I also don't talk of racial issues and ramifications because I feel they would be highly insulted if I did.

However, I do sense an underlying and growing agitation at the notion of constantly being bombarded with emotionalism when the facts dictate otherwise, as well the feeling they are exploited by Democrats because their vote is considered a done deal when most are not served well by the party that demands this.

Michael W. Kohlman, Baltimore

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