xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Littering comes down to a question of attitude

Dan Rodricks' description of a young man tossing a bag of McDonald's trash out the door of a bus not only speaks to some young adults' understanding of what constitutes acceptable behavior but also the attitudes that contribute to such behavior ("On a bus, imagining a new message for litterbugs," Dec. 11).

The fact that the young man ignored the no eating signs on the bus, impacted others with the strong "smell of fast-food" and then littered in full view of others reflects an absence of education or sensitivity to others regarding the need to follow rules.

Advertisement

For Mr. Rodricks to lament that episode in his column rather having joined the "older guys" on the bus to politely confront the man for his behavior contributed to reinforcing it.

Yes, Mr. Rodricks may have gotten a flippant response or a finger gesture for his trouble, but it also may have caused the man to think twice before doing it again.

Advertisement
Advertisement

There's more than an issue of littering involved here. Too many young people are entering society with a blatant disregard for the laws and social norms of civilized living. They need direction and to be held accountable to prevent them from entering the slippery slope of having their small offenses grow into major ones.

Perhaps if the young men lately in the news who lost their lives unnecessarily to the bullets of policemen had been taught and held accountable for proper behaviors they might still be with us.

Charlotte Eliopoulos, Glen Arm

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement