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Violence against pets must be taken seriously

In response to the editorial "Man's best friend" (Oct. 13), I am disappointed that The Baltimore Sun turned people's reactions to reported abuse into a competition as to which victims of violent crimes are more worthy of sympathy or outrage. Violence is violence, and none of it is good for our communities.

More fitting and relevant would be an article that applauds Judge Richard Jordan's imposed sentence against the Baltimore City police officer who killed a defenseless, young puppy. It is well established that violence toward animals is a predictor of violence against people. In fact, according to a survey in the Journal of Emotional Abuse, 75 percent of women who reported domestic violence also reported that their partner had threatened, hurt or killed one or more of their pets.

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By taking this senseless crime seriously and valuing this puppy's short life, Judge Jordan not only served justice for a voiceless pet, but he may have prevented a violent act against a human.

Aileen Gabbey, Baltimore

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The writer is executive director of the Maryland SPCA.

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