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Recent events have unfortunately highlighted the long road ahead in the fight to eradicate racism in America. Just last week, fraternity members in Oklahoma were expelled for chanting a racist song. Then, two police officers were shot in Ferguson, Mo., which has experienced more than 200 days of racially-charged protests after the death of an unarmed black teen.

But no event hit closer to home than repugnant racist threats made against unknown African Americans in the Bowleys Quarters neighborhood of Baltimore County in my district. The threats were made by residents who took to Facebook to suggest shooting the men spotted walking down the street. "Get the shot gun, let's go hunting," one person said.

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There is no place in civil society for these types of comments. The fact that the source of some of these comments was a local middle school teacher, a person whose job it is to enrich and broaden the minds of our young, make them even more repulsive.

I agree with County Councilwoman Cathy Bevins that the discussion is not reflective of the community at large ("Racist comments in Bowleys Quarters draw ire, Adam Jones tweet," March 12). I have always been proud to represent a racially and geographically diverse district, and Bowleys Quarters is no exception. The men and women of Bowleys Quarters are hard-working, decent people. They do not deserve to be linked to the ignorance and hatred displayed on Facebook last week, just as those threatened did not deserve to be targeted by the ignorance and hatred of a few.

Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, Washington, D.C.

The writer, a Democrat, represents Maryland's 2nd Congressional District.

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