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Black police patrol cars are in appropriate for city law enforcement

I had the pleasure this year of spending most of April through mid-October in Maine. I drove back and forth to Baltimore quite a bit, over 12,000 miles. I noticed various state patrols had switched to the black, "bad boy" cars with the new low profile light array, which seemed clever and sensible for troopers primarily on highway patrol, as the cars from the rear are not initially distinguishable from civilians with roof racks. But for a city police force? ("City police shifting from white to black patrol cars," Nov. 14.)

I can imagine how officers must feel about driving the smaller cars that replaced the Biscaynes and Crown Victorias. But this is not a good substitution.

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The white-with-blue-markings are highly distinguishable and visible, and that is a good thing. Ninety-nine percent of the time there should not be high speed pursuit, which itself may violate department policies, since high speed pursuits seem to end in tragic unintended consequence accidents. How many cars on an average are in shops for body repair? We can all attest seeing daily patrol cars with body damage and/or back on the streets with unpainted body repairs.

The comments from the police officials seem to mirror a teenage, muscle car response. Keep the primarily white patrol cars. I want to be easily able to identify who is police and who is not.

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David Kinne, Baltimore

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