xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Samuel G. Macfarlane, former Williams & Wilkins and Waverly Press CFO, dies

Samuel G. Macfarlane was an avid fan of opera.
Samuel G. Macfarlane was an avid fan of opera.

Samuel G. Macfarlane, a retired Williams & Wilkins and Waverly Press CFO who was an opera buff, died April 21 of multiple myeloma at his Roland Park Place home. He was 88.

Samuel Graham Macfarlane, son of Charles Edward Macfarlane, director of the Westinghouse Air Brake Co. metallurgy laboratory, and his wife, Margaret Reber Macfarlane, was born in Pittsburgh and grew up in the Edgewood suburb.

Advertisement

Mr. Macfarlane was a graduate of Edgewood High School, earned a bachelor’s degree in 1953 from Wesleyan University and immediately joined the Army’s security agency, where he was trained to read coded messages. He was discharged in 1956.

That same year, he married his college sweetheart, the former Susan Passano, and settled in Hartford, Connecticut, where he worked in the underwriting department of the Travelers Insurance Co. In 1959, his father-in-law, owner of Williams & Wilkins and Waverly Press, persuaded him to join the family business.

Advertisement
Advertisement

He studied accounting nights at the Johns Hopkins University and became a certified public accountant, and eventually CFO of Williams & Wilkins and Waverly Press, a position he held until retiring in 1998.

Mr. Macfarlane, a Roland Park resident, was president of the American Lung Association of Maryland and the Mental Health Association of Maryland. He was a longtime communicant of Emmanuel Episcopal Church, where he was a vestryman.

He served on the boards of Planned Parenthood and the Baltimore Opera Co.

“Opera was his great love,” his daughter, Margaret M. “Margie” Long of Guilford, wrote in a biographical profile of her father. “Whether he was working in his home office or planting in the garden, one of his favorite divas would be singing, not just to him but the whole neighborhood.”

Advertisement

When he and his wife became empty-nesters, they invited Peabody Institute graduate students to live in their home and sponsored up-and-coming opera singers who were enrolled in the Baltimore Opera Young Artist Program to the Baltimore community.

Mr. Macfarlane combined his love of travel with his interest in both opera and golf. He and his wife visited opera houses in New York, London, Paris, Vienna, Zurich and Beijing, and he played golf at the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland. Other favorite trips included biking along the Dordogne in France and hiking in the Swiss Alps.

For decades, he and his wife regularly attended the Chautauqua Institute in upstate New York, and their two favorite beach destinations were Bethany Beach, Delaware, and Westport Point, Massachusetts.

He was an avid reader of mysteries and enjoyed doing crossword puzzles in ink, and as a wine connoisseur he reveled in sharing special bottles with family and friends. He liked playing bridge and played in several groups at the Elkridge Club, where he was a member.

He spent his youth at Pittsburgh’s old Forbes Field, where he honed his enthusiasm for the Pirates and where he witnessed Bill Mazeroski’s walk-off home run that clinched the 1960 World Series for the Pirates against the New York Yankees.

While growing up a Pirates fan, he “realized he had become a true Baltimorean when he rooted for the Orioles against Pittsburgh in the 1979 World Series,” Ms. Long wrote. He was also a Baltimore Colts, Ravens and Maryland Terps fan.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, plans for a celebration-of-life gathering are incomplete.

In addition to his wife and daughter, Mr. Macfarlane is survived by two sons, David G. Macfarlane of Remington and James P. Macfarlane of Ruxton; a brother, John Macfarlane of Peterborough, New Hampshire; eight grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement