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Rosalie Connor, Oakenshawe neighborhood president, dies

Rosalie Connor - Original Credit: Handout
Rosalie Connor - Original Credit: Handout(Handout/HANDOUT)

Rosalie Jones Connor, a former president of the Oakenshawe neighborhood association, died of cardiac arrest May 9 at her Towson home. The former University Place resident was 90.

Born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park, she was the only child of Winters Jones, an electronics firm owner and radio pioneer, and his wife, Julia Connery.

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She attended All Saints School and was a 1947 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School and earned a degree in music at Notre Dame of Maryland University. She later returned to the school and received a master’s degree in music.

While attending college, she met her future husband, Eugene B. “Doc” Connor, who was then a Loyola College student.

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Mrs. Connor worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Laurel Race Course and taught school.

She was active in the Oakenshawe neighborhood association and served as its president. She worked to get residential permit parking for her community, which was often crowded by drivers from Union Memorial Hospital and Baltimore Colts and Orioles games.

Mrs. Connor was also active in the Women’s Civic League and was part of the rehabilitation project of the 9 N. Front St. house adjacent to the Baltimore Shot Tower in the 1970s. She was also a past president of the Notre Dame of Maryland University Alumnae Association.

Mrs. Connor played bridge and belonged to card clubs. She was a golf enthusiast and followed Maryland thoroughbred racing. She played tennis at the Homeland Racquet Club and at the Baltimore Country Club, where she enjoyed competing on its grass courts.

She played the piano and was a patron of the former Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, the Baltimore Opera Company and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.

“Rosalie’s greatest contribution was her ability as an incomparable conversationalist to liven up a room, and ensure that everyone in her vicinity was politely introduced,” said her son, Kevin R. Connor of Reisterstown. “With her unique inquisitive abilities, she was usually able to uncover a special connection with whom she was conversing.”

She was a former communicant of SS. Phillip and James Church and was a member of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen.

In addition to her son, survivors include another son, Eugene B. “Ford” Connor of Stoneleigh; and three granddaughters. Her husband of 40 years, a food broker, died in 1993.

A memorial Mass will be offered in the future.

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