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Robert E. ‘Bob’ Almon, retired FBI special agent, dies

Robert E. “Bob” Almon was the driving force behind the establishment of the law enforcement program at Wor-Wic Community College.
Robert E. “Bob” Almon was the driving force behind the establishment of the law enforcement program at Wor-Wic Community College.

Robert E. “Bob” Almon, a retired FBI special agent who later established the law enforcement program at Wor-Wic Community College, died Jan. 3 in his sleep at his Salisbury home. The former Parkville-Carney resident was 95.

Robert Emmett Almon, son of Eugene Thomas Almon, a Corning Glass Works employee, and his wife, Alice Reagan Almon, was born and raised in Corning, New York. He was a 1943 graduate of the Corning Free Academy, where he met and fell in love with a fellow student, the former Kathryn “Kay” Carr, whom he married in 1948.

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He began his college studies at St. Michael’s College in Toronto, and left to join the Navy. After being discharged in 1946, he returned to college on the GI Bill and earned a bachelor’s degree in 1950 from St. Bonaventure University in Olean, New York.

Mr. Almon was appointed to the FBI as a special agent by director J. Edgar Hoover in 1951 and was assigned to the field office in Pittsburgh. A year later, he came to Baltimore where he spent the remainder of his career as a squad supervisor and training agent until retiring in 1976.

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The former Parkville-Carney resident who had been a communicant and usher at Saint Ursala Roman Catholic Church in Parkville, also was a Friday evening bingo volunteer.

In 1976, he and his wife moved to Salisbury, where he was the driving force behind the establishment of the law enforcement program at Wor-Wic Community College, also in Salisbury. This later led to the founding of the Eastern Shore Criminal Justice Academy, where approximately 500 law enforcement officers were trained during his tenure at the academy.

Mr. Almon and a fellow professor, Mike Gray, established the Almon-Gray Endowment Scholarship Fund to help students enrolled in its programs. In 1988, then-Chief of Police Coulbourn Dykes sought Mr. Almon’s help in getting the department accredited. He remained with the department until 2011.

Mr. Almon and his wife, who died in 2020, hosted an annual family Thanksgiving dinner at their home, and in 1988, moved the several-day event to the Dunes Manor Hotel in Ocean City, where, family members said, there were only two requirements: “Be present for Thanksgiving dinner and attend Mass as a family on Saturday night.”

He was a parishioner of St. Francis De Sales Roman Catholic Church in Salisbury where he was a member of the endowment committee.

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, funeral services are private. But they will be livestreamed for nonfamily members Friday at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcjjBUHw-cPIZHwWLCmJvDw.

Mr. Almon is survived by five sons, Timothy Carr Almon of Columbia, Terrence Michael Almon and Eugene Thomas Almon, both of Chester, Robert Emmett Almon Jr. of Waynesboro, Virginia, and Michael Jude Almon of Arizona; a daughter, Mary Judith Funk of Salisbury; 16 grandchildren; and 29 great-grandchildren. Another son, Patrick Sean Almon, died in 2020; and a daughter, Sharon Anne Almon Skowronski, died in 2006.

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