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Richard F. ‘Dick’ Blue, retired investment banker, dies

Richard F. “Dick” Blue was a lifelong sportsman.
Richard F. “Dick” Blue was a lifelong sportsman.

Richard F. “Dick” Blue, a retired investment banker and sportsman, died April 3 of complications from Parkinson’s disease at his Brightwood Retirement Community home in Lutherville. The former longtime Owings Mills resident was 90.

Richard Fownes Blue, son of Halbert J. Blue, vice president of the Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad, and his wife, Louise Parker Fownes, was born in Pinehurst, North Carolina, and raised in Pinehurst, Pittsburgh, Washington and Owings Mills.

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He attended the Woodberry Forest School in Woodberry Forest, Virginia, and graduated in 1948 from the Gilman School, where he earned recognition as an all-state baseball player.

Mr. Blue earned a bachelor’s degree in 1952 from the University of Virginia and began his business career that year at Mercantile Bank. In 1955, he joined Robert Garrett & Sons, which was acquired by Alex. Brown & Sons in 1974. He retired in 2003 from Deutsche Bank, which had taken over Alex. Brown & Sons in 1999.

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He was a member of the board for 55 years of the Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad, which was founded in 1892 by his grandfather, John Blue, to transport timber and turpentine harvested from pine trees on the family farm in Pinehurst to Fayetteville, North Carolina.

An inveterate sportsman, Mr. Blue enjoyed waterfowl hunting on the Eastern Shore and quail hunting at his family’s Pinehurst farm, thoroughbred racing and breeding, and his longtime regular Wednesday afternoon golf game at the Greenspring Valley Hunt Club, where he was a member.

He came from a notable golfing family. His grandfather, William Fownes, won the U.S. Amateur in 1910, and his great-grandfather, Henry C. Fownes, founded and designed the Oakmont Country Club in Pittsburgh, which has been the setting for nine U.S. Opens.

His father and mother were early pioneers of Pinehurst’s golfing community and were founding members of the Pinehurst Country Club, where his father attained status as a “nationally known amateur golfer.”

Mr. Blue, who lived for 52 years on Golf Course Road in Owings Mills before moving in 2013 to Brightview, was a communicant of St. Thomas Episcopal Church.

He was also a member of the Bachelors Cotillon, Maryland Horse Breeders, Mountain Lake Country Club in Lake Wales, Florida, and the Country Club of North Carolina.

Plans for a memorial service are incomplete because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mr. Blue is survived by two sons, Richard F. Blue Jr. of Lutherville and Henry McCoy Blue of Butler; a daughter, Gary Blue Peterson of Sparks; two brothers, William F. Blue and Clark Fownes Mackenzie, both of Lutherville; a sister, Margot Mackenzie Rawlings of Pinehurst; 10 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

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