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Mary Louise Carey Faber was among the first female attorneys at Semmes, Bowen & Semmes.
Mary Louise Carey Faber was among the first female attorneys at Semmes, Bowen & Semmes. (handout)

Mary Louise Carey Faber, a retired Baltimore-born attorney who practiced in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, died of respiratory illness Oct. 11 at her home in Bear Creek Village, Pennsylvania. She was 87 and had lived in Woodbrook.

Born in Baltimore and raised on Brightside Road, she was the daughter of G. Cheston Carey, who owned Carey Marchiney, and his wife, Margaret Fitts. She was a great-niece of M. Carey Thomas, a Bryn Mawr College dean, and a niece of Millicent Carey McIntosh, past president of Barnard College.

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She was a 1950 graduate of the Bryn Mawr School, where she played tennis, field hockey, lacrosse and basketball. She attended Vassar College and was a 1970 graduate of Goucher College. She was a graduate of the University of Baltimore School of Law.

She passed the Maryland bar and joined Semmes, Bowen & Semmes, among the first woman attorneys the firm hired.

She married Eberhard Faber, a pencil manufacturer, in 1979 and moved to Wilkes-Barre, where she established a practice specializing in employment law and women’s discrimination issues. She also worked in family rights and restoring historic housing in downtown Wilkes-Barre,

Ms. Faber raised therapy dogs and served as a court-appointed special advocate with CASA of Luzerne County.

Family members said she loved the outdoors and was an accomplished gardener.

In addition to her husband of 40 years, survivors include a son, Mark C. Smith of Burlington, Vermont; three daughters, Georgia D. Smith and Deirdre M. Smith, both of Baltimore, and Margaret C. Smith of Green River, Vermont; two stepsons, Lo Faber of New Orleans and Tony Faber of Asbury Park, New Jersey; 10 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. A son, W. Conwell Smith III, died as an infant. Her marriage to W. Conwell Smith Jr. ended in divorce in 1965.

Services are private.

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