xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

I. Marshall Seidler, retired Baltimore County district judge

Judge I. Marshall Seidler obit photo
Judge I. Marshall Seidler obit photo (Baltimore Sun)

I. Marshall Seidler, a retired Baltimore County district judge who had also been a trial attorney, died of cancer Nov. 6 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson.

He was 80 and lived in Boynton Beach, Fla., and Pikesville.

Advertisement

Born in Baltimore and raised on Powhatan Avenue, he was the son of Joseph Seidler, who owned a Gay Street lunchroom in the Inner Harbor, and Celia Klayman, who worked with her husband.

He was a 1953 graduate of City College and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from the University of Maryland, College Park. He was a 1959 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Law and was admitted to the Maryland Bar that year.

Advertisement
Advertisement

He served in the Maryland National Guard from 1959 to 1965.

He joined the Legal Aid Bureau in 1959 and practiced there for a year. He then joined a Lexington Street law firm that became known as Eccleston & Seidler. He worked in the field of professional negligence. He defended physicians, attorneys, architects, engineers and teachers, among others.

"Marshall was a trial attorney," said Archibald Eccleston III, his former law partner, who lives in Glen Arm and in Florida. "He had an engaging personality and was competent and smart. He tried a lot of cases successfully."

Mr. Seidler met his future wife, Leah E. Gaponoff, at a party. He later invited her to a law school dance.

Advertisement

"He was the perfect husband, father and grandfather," said his wife.

In February 1989, Gov. William Donald Schaefer appointed Mr. Seidler to the District Court for Baltimore County. He served there until retiring in 2003.

Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. praised him as a "proud and dedicated member of the Baltimore County judiciary" and proclaimed May 20, 2003, Judge I. Marshall Seidler Day.

He then served as a retired judge, and in 2005 was appointed as the retired judge liaison on the Administrative Judge Committee.

He retired a second time in 2009.

While serving on the bench, Mr. Seidler earned a reputation as being an old-school judge.

"If you should get a traffic ticket in Baltimore County and your driving record is less than stellar, think twice about going to trial if Judge I. Marshall Seidler is on the bench," Baltimore Sun columnist Michael Olesker wrote in 2007. "Just go to the window and pay.

"In response to complaints that some traffic judges were too lenient, I recently paid a visit to Baltimore County District Court in Towson," Mr. Olesker wrote. "What I found in this case was one tough, consistent and fair judge."

The column noted that a "Cockeysville man pleaded guilty to going 80 in a 55-mph zone and tried to get a break. He should have just paid the $160 ticket. Judge Seidler pulled up the defendant's history on his computer screen. 'You've got a terrible driving record,' said the judge. 'Why did you want me to see it?'"

The defendant wound up paying $183, Mr. Olesker wrote, and also subjected himself to Mr. Seidler's lecture on his bad driving.

Mr. Seidler was an accomplisher golfer. He was a member of the Suburban Club and enjoyed playing with other members of the judiciary.

He was a member of Ner Tamid Greenspring Valley Synagogue and served on its board.

He was also a past president and coach of the Wellwood Little League. As a public speaker, he was called upon to address numerous groups.

He also enjoyed travel and dancing with his wife at social events.

Services were held Nov. 8 at Sol Levinson and Bros.

Survivors include his wife of more than 55 years; two sons, Samuel A. Seidler and Adam Z. Seidler, both of Baltimore; a daughter, Shari B. Koman of Baltimore; and five grandchildren.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement