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Jeffrey B. 'Jeff' Lamborn, tennis pro-businessman, dies

Jeffrey B. "Jeff" Lamborn died Jan. 15 from cardiac failure at <runtime:topic id="ORGHC00049">Sinai Hospital</runtime:topic>.
Jeffrey B. "Jeff" Lamborn died Jan. 15 from cardiac failure at Sinai Hospital. (HANDOUT)

Jeffrey B. "Jeff" Lamborn, a tennis professional who also owned and operated a tennis court construction and maintenance firm, died Jan. 15 from cardiac failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 67.

The son of Robert Lamborn, former headmaster of the McDonogh School, and Dorothy "Dot" Lamborn, an educator, Jeffrey Bruce Lamborn was born in Baltimore and raised on the McDonogh campus in Owings Mills.

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He attended the McDonogh School, where he played multiple sports, and graduated in 1967. He then earned a joint bachelor's and master's degree in biological sciences from Stanford University in 1972. At Stanford, he was a member of the tennis team from 1967 to 1971.

As a young man, Mr. Lamborn was a tennis pro at Rockywold and Deephaven camps in New Hampshire. After relocating to the Baltimore area, he worked as a tennis pro at the L'Hirondelle and Elkridge clubs and the Greenspring Valley Country Club.

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He also was associated with the Baltimore County Department of Recreation and Parks summer programs and headed the Gold Cup Tennis Program.

"As a coach, he was honored to work with a number of the top juniors in the Mid-Atlantic region, including a young Pam Shriver," his daughter, Taylor Lamborn of Lakewood, Ohio, wrote in a biographical profile of her father.

Another student he coached was Howard Head, inventor of the Head metal ski and Prince tennis racket. He later worked with Mr. Head at Prince Manufacturing Co. on such revolutionary projects as a ball-throwing machine, oversized tennis rackets and tennis court resurfacing techniques.

He also became one of the company's top regional sales representatives.

In the early 1980s, Mr. Lamborn established Sports Concepts, which later became Lamborn Associates — a firm that built and maintained tennis courts. One of his most notable projects was restoring the Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I., to its original clay courts.

Mr. Lamborn suffered a stroke 17 years ago, but overcame it and was not retired at the time of his death.

Along with tennis, the longtime Stevenson resident enjoyed photography, gardening and playing with his dog TinkerBelle, family members said.

A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Feb. 4 in the Tagart Chapel at McDonogh School, 8600 McDonogh Road.

In addition to his daughter, he is survived by his wife of 31 years, the former Beckie Yoder; a son, Garrett Lamborn of Clinton, N.Y.; his father, Robert Lamborn of Fort Collins, Colo.; a brother, Alan Lamborn of Fort Collins; a sister, Kathleen Lamborn of Ashland, Ore.; and many nieces and nephews.

—Frederick N. Rasmussen

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