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Jacob Radin was a longtime violinist and certified public accountant who served on the board of the Shriver Hall Concert Series for several decades.
Jacob Radin was a longtime violinist and certified public accountant who served on the board of the Shriver Hall Concert Series for several decades. (Baltimore Sun)

Jacob Radin, a longtime violinist and certified public accountant who served on the board of the Shriver Hall Concert Series for several decades, died Jan. 31 of prostate cancer at the Springwell Senior Living community in Mount Washington.

He was 99, and just 17 days short of celebrating his 100th birthday, said a daughter, Tillie Myers of Arlington, Va.

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"Jake played the way he did everything, with his humanity shining through," said Rabbi Donna Kirshbaum, a cellist and a former Baltimorean who played in quartets with Mr. Radin for more than 20 years, and now lives in Israel. "That's why he was such an extraordinary human being."

"He had vast experience and knowledge of music, and he raised the awareness of anyone who played with him," said Fay Rosinsky, a Clarksville cellist.

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Jacob Radin was the son of Joseph Radin and Mollie Radin, Jewish immigrants, who owned and operated a corner grocery store in Chattanooga, Tenn., where he was born and raised.

Mr. Radin was 8 years old when he began studying the violin. He studied at the Cadek Conservatory of Music in Chattanooga and, as a senior at Chattanooga High School, was a founder in 1933 of the Chattanooga Symphony.

He earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1937 from the University of Chattanooga. Drafted into the Army in 1941, he held a desk job while playing in the Army Band.

In 1944, he married the former Margaret "Peggy" Morrison, and after the end of World War II, the couple returned to Baltimore.

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Mr. Radin joined the violin section of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in 1946, studied at the Peabody Conservatory of Music, and after the birth of a daughter decided that despite his love of music, it didn't pay the bills.

In 1948, he went to work for the Farboil Paint Co., eventually becoming the company's comptroller and treasurer.

He began studying for his certified public accountant certification at the old Baltimore College of Commerce, from which he graduated in 1955.

After retiring from Farboil in 1980, he went to work as an accountant for Walpert, Smullian and Blumenthal, a tax and consulting firm. He retired a second time in 1990.

The former Greenspring Avenue resident later moved to The Towers in Northwest Baltimore. He continued to conduct a private accounting practice until he was 95.

He played with the Gettysburg Symphony Orchestra, in theater pit orchestras and in quartets. He routinely held chamber music gatherings at his home.

"He was the most disciplined person I have ever met in my life. He practiced every night," said his daughter, Ms. Myers.

He was in his early 70s when he began experiencing hearing difficulty and switched from playing violin to the cello.

"This is quite difficult because the cello has a different clef," said his daughter.

During the 1980s, he coached chamber music students at the Baltimore County Community College, Essex, with Arno Drucker, a pianist.

In the 1990s, he coached University of Maryland, Baltimore County students with Robert Gerle, a concert violinist, and in the early 2000s with cellist Cecylia Barczyk at Towson State University.

"When it came to his music he was confident, not arrogant, warm but not sentimental, and professional and not pedantic," said Ms. Kirshbaum. "He was a quiet man, not from shyness, but from his humility."

"As a person, he was very quiet, learned and gentle. He was an incredibly dignified person," said Ms. Rosinsky. "He was an impeccable musician and fun to play with."

He was a member of the local chapter of the American Federation of Musicians and had served on the board of the Shriver Hall Concert Series for 25 years.

Mr. Radin worked out three times a week at the Maryland Athletic Center and, after he gave up driving at 95, he continued to exercise at the Edward A. Myerberg Senior Center.

"He exercised his entire life," said Ms. Myers.

He attended the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute where he studied religion, learned Tai Chi and memoir writing and completed a family memoir.

Mr. Radin enjoyed listening to music and opera and attending BSO and Shriver Hall concerts. He was also an inveterate photographer.

His wife of 60 years, a retired child therapist with Jewish Family and Children's Service, died in 2004.

Funeral services were held Feb. 4 at Sol Levinson & Bros. in Pikesville.

In addition to his daughter, Mr. Radin is survived by another daughter, Janet Martinez of Marriottsville, three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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