xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Ida Goldberg, school fundraiser

Ida Goldberg
Ida Goldberg

Ida Goldberg, who raised funds for Jewish schools and had an award given out in her honor at the Talmudical Academy, died of renal failure Sept. 27 at the Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital. The former Mount Washington resident was 104.

Born in Sosnowiec, Poland, she came to Baltimore as a 3-year-old with her parents, Aaron Noonberg and Sophie Honigman Noonberg. Her father ran a shoe repair business.

Advertisement

"My mother could recall the boat ride over and landing at Locust Point," said her son, Hirsh Goldberg, a public relations consultant who lives in Pikesville. "She recalled how choppy the water was."

The family lived in East Baltimore and on Smallwood Street. She completed the eighth grade in the city's public schools and also took religious instruction from her rabbi's wife.

Advertisement

In 1933, she married Herman Goldberg, an attorney who worked for the National Labor Relations Board. They lived on Auchentoroly Terrace and later moved to Merville Avenue in Mount Washington.

After the birth of her two sons, Mrs. Goldberg became a fundraiser for Jewish schools. She joined the Ladies Auxiliary of the Talmudical Academy, a school then located at Cottage and Springhill avenues in Park Heights.

Rabbi Yehuda Lefkovitz, president of the Talmudical Academy, said, "She was a remarkable woman. She had a smile on her face that could light up a room."

She also went on to raise funds for Bais Yaakov School for Girls and the Ner Israel Rabbinical College.

"My mother was known for her warm, optimistic personality," said her son, who was Mayor Theodore R. McKeldin's press secretary. "One of her favorite sayings was, 'Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift from God, and that's why we call it the present.'"

He said she never raised her voice and often said, "I cannot hate." It was that positive outlook on life, he said, that made her not only a worker but also a leader. "People were impressed by her optimism."

In 2000, her name was placed on the Hall of Honor at Talmudical Academy, which is now on Old Court Road. It noted her fundraising ability and her role as the founder and chairwoman of its life members.

"My mother ran luncheons and held meetings for years for the school," her son said. "She always seemed to be fundraising. Our phone would often ring when we were eating suppers."

Glicka Creeger, a friend who was also a past president of the Talmudical Academy Auxiliary, recalled working with Mrs. Goldberg for nearly 25 years.

"She was unforgettable," said Mrs. Creeger, who lives in Baltimore. "She was sweet, friendly, warm and knowledgeable."

After turning 100, Mrs. Goldberg returned to the Talmudical Academy for graduations, when an award, the Crown of Torah, was given to a graduating senior in her honor by the ladies auxiliary.

Her son recalled another of her sayings: "Train up a child in the way he should go, and he will never depart from it."

Advertisement

He said his mother never drank alcohol and never smoked. Her favorite beverage was hot water. "She did have a sweet tooth," her son said. "She never seemed to get depressed. She lived life on an even keel. She was an appreciative person, and she always complimented others.

"She loved nature and gardening and would remark about the colors of nature and how food and flowers with their colors could come out of a brown ground," he said. "People were amazed at how vibrant she was until the last week of her life."

"Judaism was very important to her. She would sit at the table with her prayer book," said Hillary Mosser, a geriatric nursing assistant at Levindale. "The day she died, she blew a kiss to me and my co-worker. She never had a bad word to say. She woke up happy."

In addition to her son, survivors include another son, Victor Goldberg of Far Rockaway, N.Y.; nine grandchildren; 24 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Her husband of 52 years died in 1985.

Services were held Sept. 28 at Sol Levinson and Bros.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement