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Horace L. Smith, former Catholic Charities security officer who earlier had been a city probation officer, dies

Horace L. Smith "embraced living in Baltimore even though his upbringing was that of a country boy,” his son, Kevin L. Smith, said.
Horace L. Smith "embraced living in Baltimore even though his upbringing was that of a country boy,” his son, Kevin L. Smith, said.

Horace L. Smith, former Catholic Charities supervisor and security officer who earlier worked for the Baltimore Division of Parole and probation, died June 29 of cancer at his home in the city’s East Arlington neighborhood. He was 84.

Horace Lowary Smith, son of Robert I. Smith, and his wife, Bertha Cooper, was born and raised one of nine children in Bellevue in Talbot County.

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After graduating from high school in 1954, he began his college studies at what was then Bowie State Teachers College, now Bowie State University, from which he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1958.

While he was at Bowie, he met and fell in love with the former Beatrice L. Trotman, whom he married in 1962.

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After graduating from college, he joined the Army and served with the Signal Corps until being discharged with the rank of E-4 in 1961.

Mr. Smith began working in 1962 as a parole and probation officer at Patuxent Institution in Jessup but spent the majority of his career with the Baltimore Division of Parole and Probation, said his son, Kevin L. Smith of East Baltimore.

After retiring in 1991, he began a second career as a security officer and supervisor with Catholic Charities, where he worked until 2012 when his wife became ill.

His wife, who was an Anne Arundel County public school educator, died in 2015.

“He embraced living in Baltimore even though his upbringing was that of a country boy,” his son wrote in a biographical profile of his father. “Easton and Bellevue , Talbot County, were not the bright lights of the city, but he loved both places.”

Mr. Smith was a caring neighbor who would “help whomever,” his son said in a telephone interview.

“While he had no official hobbies, he liked staying busy,” his son said. “He installed wood paneling in his house and in his club cellar where he built a bar.”

In addition to home improvement projects, Mr. Smith enjoyed working in his yard.

Reflecting on his parents, Mr. Smith said his mother was a “smart mouth” while his father was a “practical joker.”

Mr. Smith was a longtime member of Douglas Memorial Community Church.

Plans for a virtual funeral service are incomplete.

In addition to his son, Mr. Smith is survived by two grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

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