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Herbert A. Schwartz was a Baltimore artist.
Herbert A. Schwartz was a Baltimore artist.

Herbert A. Schwartz, a Baltimore artist who formerly owned an advertising agency and a Mount Washington jewelry store, died of complications from dementia Nov. 9 in Winchester, Va., at the home of a niece. He was 93.

The son of Philip Schwartz, a Russian immigrant and concert violinist, and Anna Schwartz, Herbert Aaron Schwartz was born in Baltimore and raised on Caroline Street. His parents owned and operated a grocery store.

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He was a 1939 graduate of City College and attended the Maryland Institute College of Art.

"As a child, every day after school he did sketches of anyone and everyone he saw at the store or on the street. He told me [that] at that age, he was never without pencil and paper," said a daughter, Sandra Southwick of Sykesville.

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In 1943, he married Shirley Gordon, and the couple later lived in Mount Washington and Canton.

As a young man, Mr. Schwartz was advertising manager for Reliable Stores. He also furnished illustrations for other downtown department stores.

He later handled publicity for JF Theatres, one of the largest movie theater chains in Maryland at the time. It brought him in contact with many Hollywood stars, his daughter said.

In the 1960s, he established Herbert Schwartz Advertising, and in the 1970s, he became interested in gem cutting and jewelry making and opened the Opal Emporium in Mount Washington.

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Mr. Schwartz enjoyed drawing cityscapes of Baltimore, many of which were published on The Baltimore Sun's letters to the editor page.

In 2000, The Sun reported that Mr. Schwartz was the owner of the Little Gallery on the Square in Canton, where if he "doesn't have a rendition of your favorite neighborhood, he can pen-and-ink and –watercolor it on commission. His studio/shop is crammed with local scenery, most of his creations going for $35 to $125."

"He loved his city," said Ms. Southwick.

For the last 41/2 years, Mr. Schwartz had lived in Winchester. Earlier, he and his wife had lived for several years in Leesburg, Fla., where he continued painting people, dogs, racehorses and cityscapes. His wife died in 2012.

Services were private.

In addition to his daughter, Mr. Schwartz is survived by two other daughters, Barbara Goodrich of Sykesville and Jan Brown of Mount Washington; two grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

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