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Guy T. ‘Trev’ Warfield III, former president of Warfield Dorsey insurance brokerage, dies

Guy T. ‘Trev’ Warfield III was president of the Warfield Dorsey Co. for 45 years until retiring in 1995.
Guy T. ‘Trev’ Warfield III was president of the Warfield Dorsey Co. for 45 years until retiring in 1995.

Guy T. “Trev” Warfield III, former president of the Warfield Dorsey Co., a Towson insurance brokerage, died Feb. 22 at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of complications from a fall he suffered at his Blakehurst Retirement Community home. The former longtime Riderwood resident was 91.

Guy Trevlyn Warfield III, son of Guy T. Warfield Jr., president of the Warfield Dorsey Co., and his wife, Grace Diffenderfer Warfield, a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Malvern Avenue in Ruxton.

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Known as Trev, he was a 1947 McDonogh School graduate and earned a bachelor’s degree in 1951 from Cornell University, where he was on the lacrosse team and was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.

After serving two years in the Air Force where he was stationed at Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines as a lieutenant during the Korean War, he returned to Baltimore and joined the family-owned business that had been established in 1919 by his grandfather.

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After his father’s death, Mr. Warfield succeeded him as president, a position he held for 45 years until retiring in 1995. The business was later sold in 2011.

The former longtime resident of Coniston Road in Riderwood who moved to Blakehurst nine years ago, spent 80 summers at a family cottage on Walloon Lake in northern Michigan, where he was also a member of the Walloon Lake Country Club, where he organized popular bingo nights, family members said.

An accomplished builder, he constructed a deck, garage and pool at his Coniston Road home, earning Mr. Warfield the nickname of “Homo Mechanicus.”

Mr. Warfield was an avid skier who enjoyed the sport throughout the United States and the Alps.

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He learned to sail as a boy growing up on Lake Walloon. Later he sailed the Chesapeake Bay aboard his boat the Chasseur, which he named in honor of his ancestor Capt. Thomas Boyle, a privateer who sailed one of the most successful clippers in the bay during the War of 1812.

Mr. Warfield’s sailing exploits took him to Maine, the Intracoastal Waterway in Florida, and the Bahamas. He sailed to Mexico and Tahiti, and organized boat charters for 30 people in the Greek and the Virgin islands.

He founded a bridge group for 20 couples and remained active with the Cornell community until his death.

Mr. Warfield was a communicant of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer.

He donated his body to the Maryland State Anatomy Board, and because of the coronavirus pandemic, plans for a memorial service are incomplete.

In addition to his wife of 69 years, he is survived by three sons, Guy Warfield of Ruxton, David Warfield of Sparks and Henry Warfield of Butler; a daughter, Grace Hughes of Boulder, Colorado; 10 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

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