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Geraldine Fallon
Geraldine Fallon (HANDOUT, Baltimore Sun)

Geraldine Q. Fallon, who sold real estate and had been a teacher, died of congestive heart failure Dec. 10 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 82 and lived in Riderwood.

Born Geraldine M. Quinn in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Raymond J. Quinn, a Veterans Administration worker, and Monica Robertson Quinn. She grew up on North Streeper Street in East Baltimore and was a 1951 graduate of the Catholic High School of Baltimore.

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She earned a bachelor's degree at Notre Dame University of Maryland in 1955.

"She was the first member of her family to pursue higher education. She established lifelong friendships with many college classmates and later helped form bridge and book clubs that still meet today," said her daughter, Megan Mooney Wolfe of Owings Mills.

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Mrs. Fallon developed an interest in language and taught Latin and French at Notre Dame Preparatory School in the 1950s, her daughter said.

Family members said she had a flair for fashion and also worked as a model for Hutzler's and local advertising agencies. Mrs. Fallon appeared on local television as a Native American dancer for American Brewery ads. She also appeared at local events for the brewery.

"She was particularly fond of millinery and maintained an ever-expanding collection of hats," said her daughter, a sales agent with a family real estate firm, O'Conor and Mooney.

"She sang and played piano and she loved to dance. Her father, who was a World War I veteran, often enlisted her to perform in USO shows at area military hospitals," her daughter said.

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In 1956, she married Thomas J. Mooney III, a Loyola College graduate who served in the Army in West Germany. After his military service ended, they returned to Baltimore and lived in an East 33rd Street home that overlooked the old Memorial Stadium.

Mr. Mooney, an attorney, represented Northeast Baltimore in the Maryland House of Delegates in the 1960s. They later settled in Pinehurst and raised their four children. They were married 25 years before divorcing. He died in 1998.

In 1966 Mrs. Fallon returned to teaching and joined the faculty of the old Baltimore Academy of the Visitation on Roland Avenue. In addition to her classroom work, she also helped stage school operettas, including "Babes in Toyland," and plays. She also played the piano for her students.

Former students recalled her as a gifted teacher who brought her own style to the classroom.

Mrs. Fallon changed careers in the middle 1970s after the school closed. She began selling residential real estate and was long associated with O'Conor and Flynn Realtors.

"She often found a home she liked better than a current residence," her daughter said, recalling the family lived in Dulaney Towers, Charlesbrooke, Fireside Circle, Hampton, West Towson and Riderwood.

"We called her gypsy woman," Ms. Wolfe said. "There was one seven-year period where we moved seven times. We started to ask, 'Why unpack?' But she would always have the house done and completely together the day after we moved in."

In 1982 she married John "Jack" Fallon, an insurance broker. He died in 2008.

Mrs. Fallon was the youngest of four sisters.

"The four Quinn sisters remained devoted to each other throughout their lives. When their children were grown, they organized a trip to Ireland. They rented a cottage on the west coast of Ireland spent a month traveling in their family's ancestral home," her daughter said. "The four also made annual shopping trips to New York City that would include several Broadway shows and visits to St. Patrick's Cathedral."

Family members said that a 2004 Quinn reunion attracted 100 relatives spread among three generations.

"She always told us family is the most important thing in our lives," said her eldest son, Thomas J. Mooney IV of Lutherville.

A Mass of Christian burial will be held at 11 a.m. Jan. 3 at St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church, 740 N. Calvert St., where she was a member.

In addition to her daughter and son, survivors include two other sons, Timothy J. Mooney of Riderwood and Patrick J. Mooney of Murray Hill; a sister, Constance Q. Rossetti of Atlanta, Ga.; and nine grandchildren.

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