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Dr. Frank T. Kasik, Parkville practitioner and deputy county medical examiner, dies

Dr.Frank Thomas Kasik, Jr.
Dr.Frank Thomas Kasik, Jr. (Baltimore Sun)

Dr. Frank Thomas Kasik Jr., a retired general practitioner who treated generations of Parkville patients, died of congestive heart failure Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center.

The Parkville resident was 97.

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Born in Baltimore and raised on Rosemont Avenue in Overlea, he was the son of Frank T. Kasik, a Haas Tailoring clothing designer, and Rose Smetana, a homemaker.

He attended St. Wenceslaus School and was a 1936 Loyola High School graduate. Family members said he bicycled to high school, using a shortcut through the old Eudowood tuberculosis sanitarium property east of Towson.

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He initially studied to become a pharmacist and, in 1941, began practicing. During World War II he served in an Army medical unit in North Africa, Sardinia, Corsica and Italy. He left military service as a lieutenant.

After the war, he earned a medical degree at the University of Maryland.

He met his future wife, Mary I. Leech, a secretary at the old Safe Deposit and Trust Co., at a Roman Catholic social event. They married in 1946.

Dr. Kasik opened an office in the basement of his home at 9005 Harford Road in Parkville. He practiced from 1953 to 1996, when he retired.

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"When we moved there, it was country. There was no Beltway. He became everyone's doctor in the neighborhood," said a daughter, Kathleen K. Jennings of Baltimore.

Dr. Kasik established a large practice and began each workday at 8 a.m. In the afternoon he visited hospitals and worked evenings from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. He took off Wednesdays and worked every third weekend.

"On Wednesdays, he visited the nursing homes and the shut-ins," said Dr. Michael Hyle, an Overlea physician who practices internal medicine. "He was a quick wit and a jolly guy and a wonderful man."

Dr. Kasik had been the company physician at the Domino Sugars plant in Locust Point. He also treated the Jesuits at Loyola Blakefield and priests and nuns in St. Ursula parish.

"My father was like Marcus Welby. He was a humble guy, and his patients loved him," said another daughter, Peggy K. Forrester. "He treated three or four generations in the same family."

A former chairman of the Baltimore County Medical Society, he was also a deputy Baltimore County medical examiner and was called to unattended deaths, crime scenes and accidents.

"All up and down the Harford Road, people spoke to me of how he engendered confidence," said the Rev. Michael Roach, pastor of St. Bartholomew's Roman Catholic Church in Carroll County. "Many affectionately called him Uncle Frank."

Dr. Frank H. Morris, a cardiologist, recalled Dr. Kasik.

"He was a caring physician and a kind man who grew up in a different era of medical practice. It was a time when medicine was practiced at the bedside," said Dr. Morris. "He used a stethoscope and talked to his patients before there were sophisticated tests. He [provided] quality care for his patients."

James Evans, who lives at Oak Crest Village in Parkville, said Dr. Kasik "took care of my family for years."

"Frank was a doctor who made night calls," Mr. Evans said. "He was very personable and he made his patients feel confident."

Family members said he once took golf lessons at the Country Club of Maryland. He hit a hole-in-one, and his instructor told him he needed no more instruction. Dr. Kasik gave up the game that day, family members said.

A funeral Mass will be held at 12:30 p.m. Thursday at St. Ursula's Roman Catholic Church, 8300 Harford Road, where he was a member.

In addition to his daughters, survivors include two sons, Frank T. Kasik III of Manassas, Va., and John J. Kasik of Columbia, S.C.; another daughter, Carol K. Curry of Rodgers Forge; 14 grandchildren; and 19 great-grandchildren. His wife of 51 years died in 1997.

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