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Edwin Roland ‘Ted’ Mowbray III, VP of a Hunt Valley brokerage firm and longtime GBMC Foundation board member, dies

Edwin Roland “Ted” Mowbray III was a former president of Roland Park Baseball Leagues.
Edwin Roland “Ted” Mowbray III was a former president of Roland Park Baseball Leagues.

Edwin Roland “Ted” Mowbray III, vice president of Folger Nolan Fleming and Douglas Inc., a Hunt Valley brokerage firm, who had been a longtime member of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center Foundation board, died of heart failure Wednesday at his Ruxton home. He was 77.

“Ted was a prince of a man. He was the kind of guy who could talk to a CEO, a fellow board member, or a person who was an entry-level staff member. He could talk to people on all levels,” said John C. Jeppi, senior director of principal gifts at GBMC. “He was one of the nicest people that you’d ever want to meet and I never heard him utter one word of anger. He was absolutely a kindhearted gentleman and free of any pretense.”

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Sandy Weeks, a lawyer who is general counsel at Wexford Science and Technology, had been a close friend for more than 50 years, both personally and professionally.

“Ted was remarkably upbeat and positive, and he always saw the positive side of things,” Mr. Weeks said. “If we were going to play golf on the weekend I’d say it looks like rain, and he’d say, ‘No, it’s going to clear up.’ He was just a great, great friend.”

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Edwin Roland Mowbray III, known as Ted, was the son of Edwin R. Mowbray Jr., a career naval aviator and lieutenant commander, and his wife, Nancy Lane Hebb, who worked in real estate sales, was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park.

He was 7 years old when his father was killed in 1951 in New York while testing fighter planes. After his father’s death, his mother married John S. Hebb, a lawyer and a partner at the Baltimore law firm of Miles & Stockbridge, who helped raise him.

After graduating in 1962 from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1967 from what is now Loyola University Maryland. An Army reservist, he attained the rank of sergeant specialist 5 and was discharged in 1974.

Mr. Mowbray began his financial career in 1968 at the old John C. Legg & Co., which became Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc. In 1989, he joined Baker Watts & Co., which later became Ferris, Baker Watts and where he was made a partner in 1984.

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In 1989, he returned to Legg Mason where he worked for seven years before rejoining the staff of Ferris Baker Watts in 2006. He worked from 2009 to 2013 for RBC Wealth Management before joining Folger Nolan Fleming and Douglas Inc. as a vice president in 2013. He had yet to retire.

Since 2007, Mr. Mowbray had been a member of the GBMC Foundation board.

“Because he had had so many years in the financial industry he was a huge asset for us, and was very good at relaying financial information in layman’s terms,” Mr. Jeppi said. “He knew the numbers and we didn’t have to teach him anything, so we put him to work.

“He joined the board and then we gave him more and more responsibilities. He served on the philanthropy committee, gift planning advisory board, finance committee, and was treasurer of the GBMC Foundation, all at the same time.”

Mr. Mowbray and his wife of 51 years, the former Rebecca Banks, were perennial members of GBMC’s William A. and Jarnetta Kroh Society and Virginia Sherwood Council, and were loyal supporters of the hospital’s annual golf tournament and other events.

“We did business together and he managed one of my portfolios, and he approached it on a friendly basis,” Mr. Weeks said.

The couple, in conjunction with the Roland Park Garden Club, helped make GBMC’s Pink Garden, which celebrates breast cancer survivors, a reality.

Mr. Mowbray’s “gregarious nature, infectious laugh and smile won him many friends in Baltimore and around the nation,” according to a biographical profile submitted by his family.

He was an avid Ravens and Orioles fan and was a former president of Roland Park Baseball Leagues where he also had been a coach. He was an inveterate golfer, tennis player and world traveler.

Mr. Mowbray was also a member of the Green Spring Valley Hunt Club, L’Hirondelle Club, and Grand Harbor Golf and Beach Club in Vero Beach, Florida.

“Ted was the guy who kept me playing golf when I wanted to give it up. He made me into a fairly respectable golfer,” Mr. Weeks recalled. “We used to play once or twice a week.”

Mr. Mowbray enjoyed going to the beach, and his two favorites were Vero Beach and Cape May, family members said. He also liked attending his grandchildren’s sporting events.

For years, Mr. Mowbray, Mr. Weeks and several others were members of a group that met for a Christmas luncheon.

“Last Tuesday, we were at The Valley Inn, and Ted, who was always was habitually late, arrived five or 10 minutes late, came in with a big smile on his face,” Mr. Weeks said. “It proved to be our final luncheon together because the next day he was dead. And when we think back on it, it was and will be one of our best and fondest memories.”

Mr. Mowbray was a communicant of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer at 5603 N. Charles St., where a funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Jan. 13.

In addition to his wife, Mr. Mowbray is survived by his son, J. Bradford Mowbray of Lancaster, Pennsylvania; a daughter, Jennifer Barta of Towson; two brothers, Stephen Mowbray of Mount Vernon Place and Todd Hebb of Ruxton; a sister, Drayden Hebb of Guilford; and five grandchildren.

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