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Doris E. Welsh, former police commissioner's secretary, dies

Doris Welsh worked in the Baltimore Police Department for three decades.
Doris Welsh worked in the Baltimore Police Department for three decades. (HANDOUT)

Doris E. Welsh, who had been secretary to two city police commissioners and was an avid Orioles fan, died Friday from complications of kidney failure at Hart Heritage Estates Assisted Living in Forest Hill. The longtime Bel Air resident was 95.

The former Doris Eddins was born in Zebulon, N.C., and raised in Rolesville, N.C. She was the daughter of Lonnie Eddins, a farmer, and his wife, Estelle Eddins, a homemaker.

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After graduating in 1941 from Rolesville High School she came to Baltimore, where she attended Strayer Business School, and the next year married William Ernest Welsh, who entered the Army during World War II.

In 1951, Mrs. Welsh took a job as a court clerk in the Baltimore Police Department’s Southern District to purchase a dining room suite, and ended up with a more than three-decade police career.

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She served as secretary to two police commissioners, Donald D. Pomerleau, who headed the department from 1966 to 1981, and his successor, Frank J. Battaglia, who held the office from 1981 to 1984.

She retired in 1982.

The former longtime resident of Hercules Drive in Bel Air was an active member of Calvary Baptist Church, where she especially enjoyed attending Sunday school, family members said.

In addition to being an Orioles fan, she liked reading and traveling.

Her husband of 55 years, former supervisor of the state Department of Parole and Probation, died in 1997.

Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday at the Schimunek Funeral Home, 610 W. MacPhail Road, Bel Air.

Mrs. Welsh is survived by her daughter, Pauline R. Frantz of Street; a brother, Bob Eddins of Millsboro, Del.; a sister, Betty Hoccutt of Rolesville; two grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

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