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Carl A. ‘Skip’ TenHoopen Jr., former president of Annapolis Bank and Trust Co., dies

Carl A. “Skip” TenHoopen Jr., the retired president of the Annapolis Bank and Trust Co., died April 1 at Gilchrist Hospice Towson of complications from a fall. He was 94 and lived at the Blakehurst Retirement Community.

The son of Carl A. TenHoopen, an executive with U.S. Steel, and his wife, Marguerite Berry, a homemaker, he was born in Lakewood, Ohio, and raised in Beachcliff.

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“My father was an only child and rather spoiled. He had a great sense of humor and loved to tease everyone, especially his children,” said his daughter, Gail T. Koch. “He thought it was very funny when he would embarrass us in front of our friends and dates when they came to pick us up. We always had to ask him to please behave.”

Carl A. "Skip" TenHoopen Jr. worked for U.S. Steel before becoming a banker.
Carl A. "Skip" TenHoopen Jr. worked for U.S. Steel before becoming a banker.

Mr. TenHoopen was a 1945 graduate of Rocky River High School and immediately joined the Army. He was assigned to Germany and discharged in December 1946.

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Known as “Skip,” he graduated from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in 1951. At his father’s request, he joined U.S. Steel the same year.

“He started in Pittsburgh, where my brother was born, then transferred to York, Pennsylvania, where I was born, then to Baltimore, where my two sisters were born,” said his daughter. “US Steel wanted to transfer him to Chicago, and he decided he’d had enough so someone suggested he apply to Maryland National Bank, which he did, and he started in the training program there. That’s how he became a banker.”

Mr. TenHoopen resigned as US Steel’s Baltimore district manager in 1965 to join Maryland National Bank. He worked in the bank’s commercial lending department.

He rose to become a vice president at Maryland National and in 1979 was asked to join the Annapolis Bank and Trust Company as president and chief executive officer. Mr. TenHoopen was recruited by H. Furlong Baldwin, the Baltimore banker who headed Mercantile Bankshares Corp.

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When Mr. TenHoopen retired in 1997, he was chair of the board of Annapolis Bank & Trust.

“My father was a perfectionist and expected the same of others; however, he mellowed a lot with age. My father had an excellent memory, and we were all amazed that he rarely forgot a detail or someone’s name,” said his daughter, who lives in Phoenix in Baltimore County. “Even into his 90s, he would tell us stories from when he was in college or working at his first job. He remembered everything from the name of his boss to the address of his office in Washington, D.C., in the 1950s.”

Mr. TenHoopen lived on Southgate Avenue in Annapolis and became active in the community.

He was a member of the boards of Anne Arundel Medical Center, Ginger Cover Retirement Community and St. John’s College.

He was also a member of the Annapolis Yacht Club and played at the Naval Academy Golf Course. He enjoyed games of golf with his banking clients and boating.

He moved back to Baltimore in 2000 and resided at Devon Hill on Lake Avenue and later moved to the Blakehurst Retirement Community.

His stepdaughter, Patterson Lacy, said, “He was always telling us funny stories about his adventures golfing, hunting, traveling and sailing.

“He instilled a good work ethic in us by having us work in the yard every Saturday morning. He loved our dogs and was very proud of teaching our black lab, Friday, to go down the driveway and pick up the paper. He loved telling the story of Friday picking up someone else’s paper when ours was not there.”

She also said, “His favorite saying was, ‘Don’t take yourself too seriously, because no one else will.’ ”

He was an Elkridge Club member and former subscriber to the Bachelors Cotillon.

In addition to his daughter and stepdaughter, survivors include his wife of 50 years, Ann D. Blackstone; a son, Carl A. TenHoopen III of Owings Mills; two other daughters, Diane E. TenHoopen of Baltimore and Kathryn T. Turner of Ashburn; three grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter. His first wife, Jeanne Zanowic TenHoopen, died in 1970. A stepson, Edmund S. Nash, died in 1994.

Services are private.

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