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Barbara E. Vogel, a foster mother and role model to 30 children, dies

Barbara Elizabeth Moulden Vogel was recalled for advice that "was true and was heartfelt."
Barbara Elizabeth Moulden Vogel was recalled for advice that "was true and was heartfelt."

Barbara Elizabeth Moulden Vogel, a foster parent to 30 children who recalled her firm but loving ways, died Saturday at her Perry Hall home. She was 83.

Her daughter, Marian Jean Weimer, said no medical cause of death had been determined.

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Born in Baltimore and raised on Cliftwood Avenue, she was the daughter of Henry Walter Moulden Sr., a Glenn L. Martin worker, and Marion Jean Zepp, a homemaker.

While in high school she was introduced to her future husband, Edward Weigand Vogel Sr.

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A 1956 graduate of Eastern High School, she worked in the 1950s for the Glenn L. Martin Co. and later at the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, where her husband was stationed during his Army service.

The couple also resided in Germany for a year before returning to Baltimore and settling in the Belair-Edison neighborhood.

From 1973 to 1984, Mrs. Vogel and her husband were foster parents for the Baltimore County Department of Social Services. They fostered 30 children and most of them were in emergency shelter situations. Of those she fostered, several children remained with the Vogel family for a longer time and became a permanent part of the family.

They were regarded as the couple’s own children.

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“She was a loving person and liked being around people. They enjoyed fostering children,” said her daughter, Marian Jean Weimer. “She wanted a companion, a brother, for her only son. "

Her daughter also said: “My parents were campers and took us on trips almost every summer weekend to the Maryland State Game and Fish Protective Association in Perry Hall. We had a swimming pond and a fishing pond. We had a large tent that could sleep about 10.”

In the winter, the Vogel family went ice skating on the fishing pond.

“It was a great place to be. We lived on Dudley Avenue in the city near Herring Run Park and our rowhouse had no air conditioning. Perry Hall became our vacation spot. Later on, my grandfather purchased a cottage in Bedford, Pennsylvania, and we spent our weekends there. The house was up on stilts and nevertheless it flooded quite a bit,” her daughter said.

“My mother would get on the tractor and cut the grass. But her main role was cooking. She cooked for an army of people, cleaned up, and sat on the screened porch and had a doughnut. She was at her happiest with her family and friends, watching her children be happy.”

“My mother was energetic. She was always doing something,” her daughter said. “She loved it there.”

Her foster children recalled Barbara Vogel’s love and strength as a parent.

“Miss Barb came into my life at age 10 as my own family was falling apart. By 16, I knew I had to make a drastic change or I was headed down the wrong path. She and Ed provided the love, strength, and direction I needed at a critical point in my life. I lived with this wonderful family,” said Bob “Bobby” Paff, who lives in Homeland.

“She was firm and steadfast,” he said. “You might not always like what she told you. You knew it was true and was heartfelt. We’d talk together at night as she packed lunches for the next day.

“After I left her home, went to college and got married, I came back and bought my first house right next door to hers on Dudley Avenue.”

Douglass Graham resided with the Vogels when his parents divorced.

“I needed a place to live. I was young and on my own. Miss Barb was my second mother. She took care of me like one of her own. She made sure I didn’t get in trouble. Her husband, Mr. Ed, was older and wiser,” Mr. Graham said. “My favorite time of the day was 5 p.m. and sitting around the dinner table when we discussed the day’s events.”

He also said, “I modeled my own role as a parent and how to raise a family on the direction they gave me.”

Raymond Vernon McCue, a Jacksonville, Florida, resident who moved in with the family at age 10, said, “I was so honored to be called her son.”

She and her husband moved to Perry Hall in 1990. She walked three times a week at White Marsh Mall and established a social network with other walkers.

She was a communicant at Faith Lutheran Church and Jerusalem Evangelical Lutheran Church in Northeast Baltimore.

A private funeral will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the Schimunek Funeral Home, 9705 Belair Road in Nottingham.

In addition to her daughter, and foster children, survivors include her husband of 63 years, a Glenn L. Martin and Mary Sue Candy worker; a son, Edward Weigand Vogel Jr. of Bel Air; another daughter, Tracy Elizabeth Lane of Forest Hill; eight grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

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