Aiding undocumented does city, church no good

Ian Duncan’s story “Baltimore police to recognize Catholic Church-issued ID cards for immigrants” (Oct. 10) reported that "Mayor Catherine Pugh and Archbishop William E. Lori joined church and community leaders Wednesday at the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church in Canton, which is home to a large immigrant congregation and will run a pilot of the (ID) card system.” It went on to mention that the “Police Department plays only a minimal role in enforcing immigration laws — which are a federal matter — and in March the city approved $200,000 in funding for lawyers to represent people facing deportation.”

Archbishop Lori said: “People have a right to be safe. People have a right to live in a city where we see each other as neighbors and friends, rather than strangers and enemies.”

My father, his 11 brothers and sisters and his German immigrant parents went to Sacred Heart Church in the early 20th century, but I don’t remember any talk about the need for free legal assistance to fight deportation or any need for free identification cards. That’s because my ancestors (including my mother's Irish side) all came here legally with documents.

Isn’t the church acting as accessories after the fact in circumventing established federal immigration law? Isn't that a crime or at least a venial sin? Archbishop Lori talks about “rights.” But where are the rights of citizens who are paying for those deportation lawyers to help create a safe, secure country with protected borders.

It’s rather pathetic when Baltimore and the Catholic Church need to resort to abetting illegal aliens to populate the city and the parishes to counter their dwindling numbers.

Geary Foertsch, Rehoboth Beach, Del.

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