Sexual harassment on the job not exactly a surprise for women

I found the article regarding allegations of sexual harassment at the University of Maryland’s medical school to be very interesting (“Lawsuit claims University of Maryland medical school ignored sexual harassment complaints,” Nov. 13). Sadly, Carly Goldstein is not alone.

A study conducted in December of 2017 indicated that roughly 40 percent of women in the workplace suffer from sexism and discriminatory practices. This varies from pay-wage gaps to sexual misconduct. The study also found that women with a bachelor’s degree or other higher education experience discrimination at a higher rate compared to women with less education. Gender-based discrimination prevails in the workplace not only from the direct behavior but from the lack of intolerance towards the sexism occurring.

I found it rather preposterous when Dr. Shabab Toursavadkohi told Ms. Goldstein she should “expect to be asked out because she is a pretty girl.” Ms. Goldstein being dismissed with additional sexist comments to rationalize Dr. Crawford’s actions only makes this story more heartbreaking. She also mentions multiple times how she thought if she were to tell Dr. Crawford “no,” he would butcher her career. This highlights the lack of choice she felt in this situation.

While it seems easy to resist sexual harassment hypothetically, putting yourself in Carly Goldstein’s shoes results in empathy and a more realistic understanding of her situation. Empathy, along with an institution that has a “backbone for intolerance,” as stated in the article, is what is needed to combat sexism and discrimination in the work place.

Olivia Hubshman

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