Putting one's own country first isn't wrong

When French President Emanuel Macron announced that nationalism is a “betrayal of patriotism,” I realized George Orwell’s “newspeak” is alive and well (“Trump opens armistice visit to France with jab at Macron,” Nov. 12). That rhetoric was employed by Big Brother in the novel, “1984,” and is designed to diminish our range of thought.

It might occur to France’s leader that President Donald Trump didn’t invent nationalism, it emerged as a groundswell from below as millions of Americans were sick of globalism and the “world community” we are required to support.

I find nothing wrong with putting my country first. Nor do I believe it was the cause of the World War I. That horror came about piecemeal through reckless treaty signing and a lust to try out new technologies of modern weaponry. And certainly “The Great War” was not the “war to end all wars.” Quite the opposite, the Treaty of Versailles which concluded that conflict, was directly responsible for Nazi emergence in Germany and the killing lust of the axis powers.

Mercifully, I have no personal recollections of either wars, but I’ve seen enough documentary footage to understand those disasters. Your editorial page with a printout background of Marylanders who lost their lives in World War I shocked me. But it made me determined that we must do all we can to prevent such a global conflagration ever again.

And let me hint to President Macron that without the assistance the United States and the involvement of Soviet forces, we all might be in thrall of Nazism today. I may not like President Trump, but I support putting my country first — as it represents my home and my heritage, even if some is regrettable.

Roz Nester Heid, Baltimore

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