Sexual harassment is real but Ford was no hero

As a woman who has experienced my share of sexual harassment and a few physical assaults, I feel no gratitude to Christine Blasey Ford (“Thank you, Christine Blasey Ford,” Oct. 12). Whether people believed me or not didn’t matter. I told my friends what had happened and warned them to be careful. Waiting 36 years to bring charges against someone on the short list for Supreme Court nomination disturbed me. And as I understand it, Ms. Ford’s allegations were made privately to a respected senator. Yet the information was leaked. Therefore, Ms. Ford had no choice but to tell her story to the world.

As a former legal secretary and stenographer, I understand the importance of evidence and witnesses. Ms. Ford’s charges lacked both. No doubt something dreadful happened in her past, but after three decades, she should have reconciled the trauma. Perhaps President Donald Trump’s mockery of her testimony went too far, but his facts were spot on.

What I regret about the Senate Judiciary Committee’s spotlight on the ugly subject was the way it proved women’s inability to bond and help one another. The #MeToo movement may be a step in the right direction but until girls and women decide to work together and demand resolution when a friend is harmed, little will change. If what Professor Ford experienced had been acknowledged at the time and dealt with appropriately, how much better would things be now?

For that reason, I cannot “thank” Ms. Ford for her fuzzy recollections and accusations. When bad things happen to one woman, we all must come to the victim’s aid and demand justice.

Rosalind Heid, Baltimore

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