Where's the concern about the deficit now?

Where’s the outrage? In 2010, as the country was at the lowest point of the worst economic recession since the 1930s, the tea party was formed to protest the rising federal debt initiated by President Barack Obama to restart the economy. They took their outrage to the streets and put tea party candidates into Congress, giving the GOP control.

Today, the economic upturn that began in 2010 continues unabated. But the deficit, rather than diminishing, has grown. This past year it topped $779 billion, and that’s a 17 percent increase creating a record on top of a previous year record presented by a congress controlled by political descendants of the 2010 tea party (“US budget deficit hits highest level in 6 years,” Oct. 19).

The deficit of 2010 was an investment in our future. One that is being paid off. The deficit of 2018 is wealth distribution upwards.

But there are no protests, no angry mobs in tri-cornered hats, no burning effigies of Donald Trump or Mitch McConnell, no display of outrage. Instead they initiated a tax cut that further increased the deficit by increasing spending but reducing government income.

Families can’t increase spending while decreasing income while paying ever larger credit interest debt. But the protesters of 2010 accept it now.

J. Martin, Middle River

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