Phillip J. Correlli Sr., Hampden roofer and noted saxophone player, dies

Phillip James Correlli Sr., a Baltimore roofer and accomplished saxophonist who played in several local bands, died Sept. 22 from a heart attack at his Hampden home. He was 77.

He was born in Baltimore and lived his entire life in Hampden. He was the son of Henry Correlli, who established the Correlli Roofing Co. in 1955, and Marcella Correlli, a homemaker.

He learned the roofing trade from his father, and after graduating in 1958 from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute he joined the business full time.

After his father’s death in 1967, Mr. Correlli took over the business. For years the firm was located at Falls and Clipper Mill roads; he later moved the operation to Buena Vista Avenue in Hampden. At the time of his death, Mr. Correlli was semi-retired.

“While no longer going on roofs, he still went out with the guys to do estimates,” said his wife of 58 years, the former Constance Marie “Connie” Brewer.

Some of the projects that the company worked on over the years included the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel, the Maryland Department of Motor Vehicles headquarters in Glen Burnie, Fort Smallwood and “thousands of residential and commercial businesses,” Mrs. Correlli said.

A longtime saxophone player, Mr. Correlli had been a member and leader of two bands, The Nomads and the Stepping Blues Band. He was inducted into the Maryland Entertainment Hall of Fame.

Mr. Correlli enjoyed weightlifting. He was a member of the Perry Hall Family Worship Center.

Funeral services were held Sept. 25 at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home in Hampden.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by a son, Phillip James Correlli Jr. of Hampden; a daughter, Constance M. Correlli of Hampden; a brother, Anthony Correlli of Lutherville; three grandchildren; and a great-grandson. Another son, Christopher John Correlli, died in 1991.

—Frederick N. Rasmussen

fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com

Copyright © 2018, The Baltimore Sun, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication | Place an Ad
48°