Roughly Speaking podcast: John Vassos and the shape of things to come (episode 146)

In this podcast: 


Before your grandmother could listen to a radio, someone had to figure out what it should look like. Same with television a couple of decades later. Today, we head back several decades to learn about a prolific artist named John Vassos, who designed some really cool radios and televisions, and a lot of other things (view a gallery of some of them below) — portable record players, juke boxes, restaurants, a fountain pen, even the turnstile still in use at Oriole Park and other major league ballparks. He was also involved in the design of an early fax machine intended to deliver newspapers via radio waves to homes in the 1930s. Danielle Shapiro, who lives in Baltimore, is our guest. A historian of modern design, she’s written a biography, “John Vassos: Industrial Design for Modern Life.” 


Using our app? Go to baltimoresun.com/roughlyspeaking to listen to the podcast.

To subscribe: On iPhones, iPads and iPod Touches, search for "Roughly Speaking" in the Podcasts app. On Android devices, search for the podcast in the Google Play Music app or in a third-party podcast app such as Stitcher Radio, BeyondPod or Pocket Casts, or, if the app allows, manually add its feed URL. On desktop computers, subscribe through iTunes. Or, follow on SoundCloud. Need help? Email mobile@baltimoresun.com.

Discover more episodes:

Copyright © 2018, The Baltimore Sun, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication | Place an Ad
30°