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Baltimore persona 'Plainpotatoess' pleads guilty to eight lesser charges stemming from his viral videos

The Baltimore Sun

A Baltimore man who gained online fame under the persona Plainpotatoess has agreed to a plea deal on some of the 27 charges against him stemming from his viral antics.

Marquel Carter, 20, was charged in February with one count of second-degree assault and 26 misdemeanor counts related to harassment and trespassing — all of which stem from incidents that allegedly occurred while he was filming content for his viral social media accounts under the name “Plainpotatoess.”

Carter, a Baltimore resident, describes Plainpotatoess as a persona he used to provoke people, usually through insults, while he recorded the exchanges and later posted them to Twitter and Instagram. In February, he called his critics sensitive and defended his videos, before apologizing and stating he had not realized people were seriously bothered by his actions.

In the past week, Carter agreed to plead guilty to eight of the misdemeanor charges. Baltimore state’s attorneys dropped three charges and placed another 15 misdemeanors and the assault charge on a “stet,” or inactive, docket. That means the state can opt to reopen the case at any point in the next year if prosecutors can show good cause.

Additionally, Carter agreed to stay away from the alleged victim in the assault case, a man who police say Carter kissed on the face.

These days, Carter resides in Virginia and said he has moved on from the antagonistic brand of humor that got him into legal trouble — though he says much of his old content lives on through copycat social media accounts. His Twitter account was deactivated shortly after he was charged in Baltimore.

Carter is scheduled to face sentencing for the eight misdemeanors in June.

lireed@baltsun.com

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This article has been updated to clarify the type of charges Marquel Carter is facing. The second-degree assault charge is a misdemeanor. The Sun regrets the error.
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