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Baltimore drivers aren't just bad — they're actually the worst, a new study shows

Welcome to Baltimore, where the only things worse than the baseball team are the drivers.

Out of 200 cities ranked for safe driving by Allstate, the insurance company named Baltimore last on the list — even when adjusted for population density and precipitation.

Allstate based its data on the number of years between accident claims and how often drivers braked hard. On average, drivers in Baltimore saw 3.8 years between accident claims — far below the national average of 10 years between claims, according to Allstate. And Baltimore drivers also braked hard 29.3 times per 1,000 times, 10 more times than the national average of 19 hard-brake events per 1,000 miles.

Baltimore fell one slot from its ranking last year — slipping from claiming the second-worst drivers to definitively the worst. The city has consistently ranked among Allstate’s bottom 10 cities for safe drivers during the last decade — falling steadily from its spot at No. 191 in 2008.

Looking for the safest drivers in the country? Those in Brownsville, Texas; Kansas City, Kan.; or Boise, Idaho — the top three on the list, respectively — were the least likely to experience collisions, according to Allstate.

Miami saw the greatest improvements among the safety of its drivers, jumping to 86th on the list from 123rd last year.

Other cities notable for bad drivers included Washington, D.C., (No. 198) and Boston (No. 199).

smeehan@baltsun.com

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