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Jennifer Jones, a Harford Heights Elementary School teacher, was injured in January 2013 in an altercation with a student in a school hallway. She remains off work and is fighting for more compensation.
Jennifer Jones, a Harford Heights Elementary School teacher, was injured in January 2013 in an altercation with a student in a school hallway. She remains off work and is fighting for more compensation. (Kim Hairston/The Baltimore Sun)

A 2014 Baltimore Sun series analyzed thousands of records from statewide workers' compensation claims to uncover a wide range of problems – including attacks on Baltimore school teachers, fraudulent claims and conflicts of interest by a state legislator.

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Maryland firefighters and municipalities are at odds in a high-stakes debate over a state law that presumes some cancers are related to fighting fires for purposes of awarding workers' compensation.
In 2011, Prince George's County Del. Benjamin S. Barnes became a partner in one of the state's busiest workers' compensation firms. The lawmaker wrote a three-word disclosure in blue pen on his state ethics forms, and began working on a flurry of legislation that made it easier for injured workers to win awards. As he sponsored or co-sponsored workers' compensation bills, his firm's founding partner brought in millions in workers' compensation claims over an 18-month period — raising
Local governments in Maryland confront questionable workers' compensation claims
Psychological stress of deadly police shootings in Baltimore costs public an average of $30,000
A former Baltimore police officer who now works for the Montgomery County police department pleaded guilty Thursday felony workers' compensation fraud.
Several months ago, Baltimore Inspector General Robert H. Pearre Jr. quietly decided to dedicate an agent solely to investigating workers' compensation and disability fraud within Baltimore's police and fire departments — and this week investigators announced charges against a former city officer accused of bilking taxpayers out of more than $30,000.
Officer received payments while working a second job, prosecutors allege.
Government employees are eligible to file for compensation if they are hurt on the job, and that can happen in many ways. Here are five of the oddest filings we spotted.
In October 2012, a Baltimore City firefighter was caught in a sudden burst of flames, suffering burns to his head, neck, shoulder, face and hand, according to a summary provided by the city.
City lawmakers said Monday that they were shocked by a Baltimore Sun investigation into school violence published over the weekend and plan to hold hearings to address the hundreds of injury claims filed by teachers.
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