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Savor tonight’s strawberry moon, the last ‘supermoon’ of the year. Here’s the best time to see it.

Keep your head in the clouds Thursday evening so you can gaze at tonight’s strawberry moon — the first full moon of the summer solstice and the last supermoon of the year.

Technically, Thursday’s moon is a “marginal supermoon,” according to NASA. Different experts have varying criteria for what counts as a supermoon. The Old Farmer’s Almanac does not consider June’s full moon a supermoon because it’s slightly far away from Earth than other full moons. The Almanac’s threshold is if the moon is less than 224,000 miles away from Earth, and Thursday’s moon will be 224,662 miles away.

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Nevertheless, the strawberry moon will still be large, bright and golden-hued in the night sky.

Amanda Dotson, a physics professor at Morgan State University, said not to be fooled by the name.

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“It’s not going to be pink or anything like that, don’t get too excited,” Dotson said.

The moon can have a reddish tinge depending on what’s in the atmosphere, however, Dotson explained that the moon sometimes looks red because blue light is bounced away from the atmosphere, leaving the orange/red light behind. Dotson playfully refers to this kind of moon as a “Halloween” moon because of its creepy, reddish color; though she noted that this is not an official astronomical term.

The moon gets its name from the Algonquin tribes of North America to mark the start of strawberry harvesting season. It’s typically the last full moon of the spring or the first full moon of the summer.

Europeans called the strawberry moon the “honey” or “mead” moon, possibly referring to honey being ready for harvest at the end of June, according to NASA. The word “honeymoon,” which dates back to the 1500s, may be tied to this moon because June was traditionally the month of marriages.

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Thursday’s moon will reach peak illumination at 2:40 p.m. EST, but it won’t be visible until it rises over the horizon. If you’re in Baltimore City, look out for the moonrise at 8:58 p.m. EST. The moon will rise at around the same time across Maryland, but you can check out the Almanac’s Moonrise and Moonset Calculator for your specific area. Moonrise is typically 20 minutes after sunset, according to NASA.

Dotson recommended that moon-gazers in the Maryland area look out for the moon at around 10 or 11 p.m. when it’s higher in the sky.

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