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Alleged leader of Baltimore’s Triple-C gang fired at officers in Georgia during standoff, then took his own life, police said

The alleged leader of Baltimore’s violent Triple-C gang, who fled last week after being charged in a sweeping federal indictment, died Tuesday after a standoff with Georgia police, who said he took hostages and fired at officers before killing himself.

Federal prosecutors in Baltimore had charged Gary Creek, 39, with racketeering for being the alleged founder and leader of the CCC gang — which stands for “Cruddy Conniving Crutballs.” They accused Creek of committing a murder, and members of the gang with carrying out more than 40 killings and attempted murders.

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He didn’t turn himself in as expected and instead went on the run, prompting authorities Monday to offer a $10,000 reward for his capture.

Law enforcement officers wait outside of a Sandy Springs, Ga., apartment where Gary Creek died Tuesday, June 8, 2021, following a SWAT standoff. Federal officials requested an arrest warrant Friday when Creek, 39, failed to surrender after he was named in a racketeering indictment. (AP Photo/Ben Gray)
Law enforcement officers wait outside of a Sandy Springs, Ga., apartment where Gary Creek died Tuesday, June 8, 2021, following a SWAT standoff. Federal officials requested an arrest warrant Friday when Creek, 39, failed to surrender after he was named in a racketeering indictment. (AP Photo/Ben Gray) (Ben Gray/AP)

U.S. Marshals Service spokesman Frank Lempka said Creek was tracked to an apartment in Sandy Springs, Georgia, just outside Atlanta, and fired at officers who went to knock on the door. That was around 1 p.m. Tuesday.

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The Sandy Springs Police Department initially tweeted that they believed he was alone, but later said they were treating it as a hostage situation.

Lempka told The Sun that Creek was with his girlfriend and two children, and that his girlfriend called 911 and said “he either wouldn’t let her leave or she didn’t think he’d let her leave.”

The police then tweeted just before 4 p.m. that three people had been released safely. At 4:02 p.m., they tweeted that the “suspect is deceased from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound.”

Creek had been first charged with drug conspiracy in 2019, and was released to home monitoring by a judge in May 2020 due to the coronavirus risk as COVID-19 cases spiked in the Washington, D.C., jail where he was being held. Creek said he was at particular risk for serious health complications if he contracted the virus. He was released to live with his sister and her husband, both city Fire Department supervisors, in Harford County.

Prosecutors opposed his release at the time, but the U.S. Attorney’s Office said they felt comfortable allowing him to turn himself in. Because he had done well on supervision, prosecutors allowed him to turn himself in after the indictment was unsealed last week.

Law enforcement officers wait outside of a Sandy Springs, Ga., apartment where Gary Creek died Tuesday, June 8, 2021, following a SWAT standoff. Creek, a suspected Baltimore gang leader died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound after a standoff with law enforcement Tuesday afternoon in an Atlanta suburb, authorities said. (AP Photo/Ben Gray)
Law enforcement officers wait outside of a Sandy Springs, Ga., apartment where Gary Creek died Tuesday, June 8, 2021, following a SWAT standoff. Creek, a suspected Baltimore gang leader died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound after a standoff with law enforcement Tuesday afternoon in an Atlanta suburb, authorities said. (AP Photo/Ben Gray) (Ben Gray/AP)

“For more than a year, Mr. Creek has not been charged with violating any of his conditions of release,” the U.S. Attorney’s Office said in a statement last week. “Therefore, when Mr. Creek was charged in a second superseding indictment on racketeering and drug conspiracy charges, the government determined that it was reasonable and appropriate to work through Mr. Creek’s counsel to arrange a time for Mr. Creek to self-surrender for his initial appearance on the new charges.”

Instead, Creek vanished. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives put out a $10,000 reward for his capture and said he was believed to be armed and dangerous.

An ATF and Baltimore Police investigation overseen by federal prosecutors alleges the gang is behind at least 18 murders and 28 attempted murders between 2015 and 2020. The volume of violence attributed to the group over five years is the most chronicled in a single indictment in recent memory, and spans the city.

Creek himself was shot in December 2018, in the 600 block of N. Lakewood Ave.

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