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Pasadena man charged with two misdemeanors, DUI after police said he threatened protesters with bat at Vince’s Crab House

Keith Francis Duvall, 52, is charged with second-degree assault, disorderly conduct and driving under the influence of alcohol after threatening protesters outside Vince's Crab House, according to Baltimore County Police. Photo via Baltimore County Police Department.
Keith Francis Duvall, 52, is charged with second-degree assault, disorderly conduct and driving under the influence of alcohol after threatening protesters outside Vince's Crab House, according to Baltimore County Police. Photo via Baltimore County Police Department.

Baltimore County Police charged a 52-year-old Pasadena man after they say he threatened protesters outside Vince’s Crab House last week.

Keith Francis Duvall is charged with two misdemeanors, second-degree assault and disorderly conduct, and driving under the influence of alcohol. He was released from jail on his own recognizance after a bail review hearing, according to online court records.

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Isaac Klein, an attorney listed for Duvall in court records, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Police said Duvall parked near the demonstrators outside the crab house at 610 Compass Road in Middle River and got into a “verbal exchange” with them Saturday.

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Duvall then went to his car and got a bat but was stopped by an officer as he walked back toward the protesters, police said. The officer said that after they smelled alcohol odor on Duvall’s breath, he was administered a sobriety tests and placed under arrest, the department said.

Duvall was then transported to a hospital for treatment of an undisclosed medical condition.

All five Vince’s Crab House locations were closed for more than a week after operator Vince Meyer’s social media posts, including ones that mocked Black Lives Matter protesters and that used a racial slur, circulated earlier this month.

Meyer had posted a response video that stopped short of apologizing, though he later told The Baltimore Sun that he had “a ton of remorse.” The response video was 8 minutes, 46 seconds — the same length of time that a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into the neck of George Floyd, whose death set off protests across the country against racism and police brutality.

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