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Federal prosecutors say Paul Alexander built a drug empire in Baltimore that generated more than $4 million in profits pushing cocaine, fentanyl and heroin in the city and its surrounding counties.
Federal prosecutors say Paul Alexander built a drug empire in Baltimore that generated more than $4 million in profits pushing cocaine, fentanyl and heroin in the city and its surrounding counties. (Baltimore Police Department)

A federal jury convicted Paul “Shorty” Alexander, 47, late Monday of conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in a drug ring that made millions of dollars.

The Anne Arundel County man dealt wholesale quantities of fentanyl around Baltimore and its suburbs, prosecutors say. Federal agents brought down Alexander, of Hanover, after an 11-month investigation and seized from him more than 10 kilograms of fentanyl and more than $4 million in cash.

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“More people die of opioid overdoses than murder in Maryland, while drug dealers spend their profits on luxury cars and jewelry,” said Robert Hur, the U.S. Attorney for Maryland. “Fentanyl dealers, like Paul Alexander, sell death and despair, and dealing in fentanyl increases their odds of federal prosecution."

Also known as David Paul Hayes, Alexander was convicted of federal gun charges, conspiracy to distribute and two counts of possessing fentanyl with the intent to distribute.

Prosecutors say authorities recovered a pistol with an extended magazine and bags filled with cash and expensive jewelry. They are asking the courts to force Alexander to forfeit his money, luxury cars, Rolex watches and diamond bracelets.

Alexander faces as much as life in federal prison. He’s scheduled for sentencing in January.

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