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Review board delivers draft report on death of Baltimore Police homicide detective Suiter

The independent board that reviewed the investigation into the killing of Baltimore Police Detective Sean Suiter has delivered its draft report to the police commissioner, the board chair said Friday.

James “Chips” Stewart said the report was delivered to interim Police Commissioner Gary Tuggle on Wednesday. The city has at least 10 days to review and provide comments on the report to the board, which then intends to announce its findings to the public.

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“The BPD is allowed no editorial rights regarding our report, except that it maintains the right to excise any confidential information, such as non-public personnel information and information that might otherwise compromise other pending criminal matters,” Stewart said.

An independent panel tasked with investigating the death of Baltimore Police Detective Sean Suiter said Thursday it will issue its final report at the end of July.

Suiter, a homicide detective, was shot and killed in West Baltimore in November while conducting follow-up investigation on a triple homicide case. Police say Suiter was shot with his own weapon, which sources said was still in his hand when officers rushed to help him.

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Despite a reward of more than $200,000, the case remains unsolved and police have not publicly revealed any leads.

His death has been ruled a homicide by the state medical examiner. It was later revealed that Suiter was killed the day before he was expected to testify before a grand jury investigating the Gun Trace Task Force corruption case.

The death of Baltimore Police Detective Sean Suiter is one of the only unsolved killings of a police officer in the department’s history. Now, new details emerge in the investigation of his death.

An internal debate emerged within the police department about whether evidence suggested Suiter’s death could have been a suicide or even an accident, and then-Commissioner Darryl De Sousa created the review board in April to look into the case as well as the Police Department’s handling of the crime scene in Harlem Park.

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