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Baltimore police Detective Sean Suiter's family has not approved a GoFundMe fundraiser

Baltimore Police Commisioner Kevin Davis says that detective Sean Suiter has died after yesterday's shooting.

The family of Baltimore homicide detective Sean Suiter, who was fatally shot Wednesday, has not set up a GoFundMe page, though several unauthorized fundraising pages have been created.

Baltimore Police spokesman T.J. Smith said on Twitter that the “Suiter family HAS NOT set up a Go Fund Me page. Any pages that are purportedly for Det. Suiter are fake.”

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But a spokesman for GoFundMe said it’s not unusual for individuals who see a news event to want to help by creating a fundraising page for the families.

The Baltimore Police detective who was fatally shot Wednesday is Sean Suiter, an 18-year veteran of the force.

Bobby Whithorne said when a GoFundMe account is created, “funds are collected by our payment processors, held, and then released only to the person named as the beneficiary. Before any money can be withdrawn, the beneficiaries must accept the donations. If they accept the donations, their information, including their banking information, will be verified by our payment processor.”

As for pages that have been created for Suiter’s family, Whithorne said no funds have been withdrawn and the company has reached out to the campaign organizers and law enforcement officials to make sure any funds raised go to the detective’s family.

The Baltimore homicide detective who was shot in the head on Wednesday has died, police said. Sean Suiter was an 18-year veteran of the department.

Retired Baltimore police officer Aaron Perkins created a GoFundMe page on behalf of his group Smoking Shields' Maryland Chapter that raised $400 before it was taken down. As a retired Baltimore police officer, Perkins said he felt it was his duty to raise money for Suiter's family. Many other members of the Smoking Shields' Maryland Chapter, officers who get together to smoke cigars, are also retired city police.

The group intended to deliver the money to the police department, which could then pass the funds to the Suiters.

"Even though we're retired, that doesn't mean we don't still bleed blue," Perkins said. "Each one of us has been on that front line and seen our brothers and sisters go down."

Baltimore Sun reporter Talia Richman contributed to this article.

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