xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Schools police officer sentenced to prison in drug conspiracy

A Baltimore City school police officer was sentenced to two years in prison on Friday after pleading guilty in a federal crack cocaine case.

Napoleon McLain Jr., 31, admitted to obtaining multiple ounces at a time from his suppliers and then selling a total of 150 grams of crack to an informant for $9,800 on four occasions between December 2012 and August 2013, according to his plea agreement.

Advertisement

"It is shocking when a police officer is caught selling illegal drugs," said U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein. "Fortunately there is no evidence that the defendant distributed drugs to school students."

McLain's attorney could not be reached for comment.

Advertisement
Advertisement

McLain, a four year veteran of the school police and son of a longtime Baltimore homicide detective, resigned from his job shortly after the charges against him were filed in June.

In addition to his work at the police department, McLain had a business running a long-term care home, called Delicate Hands Home Care, in Reisterstown.

The FBI investigated the case and an agency spokesman said when McLain pleaded guilty that agents had not turned up evidence suggesting any other school police were involved in the drug dealing.

McLain faced a mandatory minimum sentence of five years in prison for the crime, but benefited from a program known as the "safety valve." The program allows non-violent first-time offenders who are not found to be major criminal players avoid the mandatory term.

Advertisement

twitter.com/iduncan

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement