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Super PAC created to oppose Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby fizzles

Kelly Norton, elections supervisor, hands documents to Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, as she filed for re-election at the State Board of Elections.
Kelly Norton, elections supervisor, hands documents to Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, as she filed for re-election at the State Board of Elections.(Kim Hairston / Baltimore Sun)

A Super PAC created to oppose State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby in the upcoming election fizzled and is shutting down, a spokesman for the group says.

The Bmore Safe Now political action committee was formed last summer and posted an 18-second ad online targeting Mosby. A spokesman for the group said it represented a coalition of “strange bedfellows” coming together to oppose the first-term top prosecutor.

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The group last week filed its fundraising report, nearly two months beyond the deadline to file such reports, showing it had raised just $5,235.

Joshua Insley, a spokesman for the group, said the state’s attorney’s race wasn’t generating enough money for donors to give to the PAC — which by law can’t support a particular candidate — as well as Mosby’s challengers.

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The field is set in the race for Baltimore State’s Attorney, with incumbent Marilyn Mosby formally filing for re-election and two attorneys making their candidacy to unseat her official.

“It became pretty clear early that kind of money wasn’t in this race,” Insley said.

Insley is supporting defense attorney Ivan Bates.

As of January, attorney Thiru Vignarajah led the fundraising race, with $412,000 cash on hand that includes a $250,000 loan he gave to the campaign himself. Mosby reported about $285,000 on hand after raising about $330,000 over the past year. Bates had $184,000 to campaign on after raising $250,000.

The Bmore Safe Now PAC spent $2,000 on media, $650 on catering for a fundraiser hosted at the Baltimore Police Fraternal Order of Police lodge, which cost $455 to rent.

The account had $2,020 cash on hand, and in a subsequent filing said it had spent the balance on legal fees, records show.

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